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A Crossnational Examination of Innovation Resistance

A Crossnational Examination of Innovation Resistance Do consumers in countries that differ widely in cultural values andin economic development also differ in their resistance to innovationsAnd, if so, why Addressing these questions will help internationalmarketing managers formulate an appropriate strategy for a successfulproduct introduction in diverse foreign markets. In this fivecountrystudy, the cultural values of fatalism, traditionalism, and religiouscommitment were found to explain crosscultural variation in innovationresistance in Senegal and in the United States, but not in India, SouthKorea, or Thailand. Even though the results were different for everycountry, fatalism was generally associated with less willingness to trynew nontechnical products and with higher levels of perceived productrisk. Differences were found to be related to entertainment and mediainnovations as opposed to technical or fashionoriented innovations. Theresults do not support the contention that a global, standardisedmarketing strategy may be appropriate for the introduction of newproducts in foreign markets. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Marketing Review Emerald Publishing

A Crossnational Examination of Innovation Resistance

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References (21)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0265-1335
DOI
10.1108/02651339110000135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Do consumers in countries that differ widely in cultural values andin economic development also differ in their resistance to innovationsAnd, if so, why Addressing these questions will help internationalmarketing managers formulate an appropriate strategy for a successfulproduct introduction in diverse foreign markets. In this fivecountrystudy, the cultural values of fatalism, traditionalism, and religiouscommitment were found to explain crosscultural variation in innovationresistance in Senegal and in the United States, but not in India, SouthKorea, or Thailand. Even though the results were different for everycountry, fatalism was generally associated with less willingness to trynew nontechnical products and with higher levels of perceived productrisk. Differences were found to be related to entertainment and mediainnovations as opposed to technical or fashionoriented innovations. Theresults do not support the contention that a global, standardisedmarketing strategy may be appropriate for the introduction of newproducts in foreign markets.

Journal

International Marketing ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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