Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A comprehensive assessment on the impact of post-processing variables on tensile, compressive and bending characteristics for 3D printed components

A comprehensive assessment on the impact of post-processing variables on tensile, compressive and... PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to characterize mechanical properties (tensile, compressive and flexural) for the three-dimensional printing (3DP) process, using various common recommended infiltrate materials and post-processing conditions.Design/methodology/approachA literature review is conducted to assess the information available related to the mechanical properties, as well as the experimental methodologies which have been used when investigating the 3D printing process characteristics. Test samples are designed, and a methodology to measure infiltrate depths is presented. A full factorial experiment is conducted to collect the tensile, compressive and bending forces for a set of infiltrates and build orientations. The impact of the infiltrate type and depth with respect to the observed strength characteristics is evaluated.FindingsFor most brittle materials, the ultimate compression strength is much larger than the ultimate tensile strength, which is shown in this work. Unique stress–strain curves are generated from the infiltrate and build orientation conditions; however, the compressive strength trends are more consistent in behavior compared to the tensile and flexural results. This comprehensive study shows that infiltrates can significantly improve the mechanical characteristics, but performance degradation can also occur, which occurred with the Epsom salts infiltrates.Research limitations/implicationsMore experimental research needs to be performed to develop predictive models for design and fabrication optimization. The material-infiltrate performance characteristics vary per build orientation; hence, experimental testing should be performed on intermediate angles, and a double angle experiment set should also be conducted. By conducting multiple test scenarios, it is now understood that this base material-infiltrate combination does not react similar to other materials, and any performance characteristics cannot be easily predicted from just one study.Practical implicationsThese results provide a foundation for a process design and post-processing configuration database, and downstream design and optimization models. This research illustrates that there is no “best” solution when considering material costs, processing options, safety issues and strength considerations. This research also shows that specific testing is required for new machine–material–infiltrate combinations to calibrate a performance model.Originality/valueThere is limited published data with respect to the strength characteristics that can be achieved using the 3DP process. No published data with respect to stress–strain curves are available. This research presents tensile, compressive and flexural strength and strain behaviors for a wide variety of infiltrates, and post-processing conditions. A simple, unique process is presented to measure infiltrate depths. The observed behaviors are non-linear and unpredictable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rapid Prototyping Journal Emerald Publishing

A comprehensive assessment on the impact of post-processing variables on tensile, compressive and bending characteristics for 3D printed components

Rapid Prototyping Journal , Volume 22 (3): 18 – Apr 18, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/a-comprehensive-assessment-on-the-impact-of-post-processing-variables-xLcn2lVPmm
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1355-2546
DOI
10.1108/RPJ-02-2015-0018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to characterize mechanical properties (tensile, compressive and flexural) for the three-dimensional printing (3DP) process, using various common recommended infiltrate materials and post-processing conditions.Design/methodology/approachA literature review is conducted to assess the information available related to the mechanical properties, as well as the experimental methodologies which have been used when investigating the 3D printing process characteristics. Test samples are designed, and a methodology to measure infiltrate depths is presented. A full factorial experiment is conducted to collect the tensile, compressive and bending forces for a set of infiltrates and build orientations. The impact of the infiltrate type and depth with respect to the observed strength characteristics is evaluated.FindingsFor most brittle materials, the ultimate compression strength is much larger than the ultimate tensile strength, which is shown in this work. Unique stress–strain curves are generated from the infiltrate and build orientation conditions; however, the compressive strength trends are more consistent in behavior compared to the tensile and flexural results. This comprehensive study shows that infiltrates can significantly improve the mechanical characteristics, but performance degradation can also occur, which occurred with the Epsom salts infiltrates.Research limitations/implicationsMore experimental research needs to be performed to develop predictive models for design and fabrication optimization. The material-infiltrate performance characteristics vary per build orientation; hence, experimental testing should be performed on intermediate angles, and a double angle experiment set should also be conducted. By conducting multiple test scenarios, it is now understood that this base material-infiltrate combination does not react similar to other materials, and any performance characteristics cannot be easily predicted from just one study.Practical implicationsThese results provide a foundation for a process design and post-processing configuration database, and downstream design and optimization models. This research illustrates that there is no “best” solution when considering material costs, processing options, safety issues and strength considerations. This research also shows that specific testing is required for new machine–material–infiltrate combinations to calibrate a performance model.Originality/valueThere is limited published data with respect to the strength characteristics that can be achieved using the 3DP process. No published data with respect to stress–strain curves are available. This research presents tensile, compressive and flexural strength and strain behaviors for a wide variety of infiltrates, and post-processing conditions. A simple, unique process is presented to measure infiltrate depths. The observed behaviors are non-linear and unpredictable.

Journal

Rapid Prototyping JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 18, 2016

There are no references for this article.