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A comparative analysis of the implications of the Islamic religion on corporate capital structures of firms in emerging market countries

A comparative analysis of the implications of the Islamic religion on corporate capital... Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the Muslim religion on firm capital structure. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare financing patterns in Muslim versus non-Muslim countries using 658 firms in 16 countries covering a period of seven years. Findings – No significant differences between Muslim and non-Muslim countries were found in terms of total debt ratios. However, significant differences were found in the choice of short-term versus long-term debt, with firms in Muslim countries showing a strong preference for short-term debt. Research limitations/implications – The findings confirm existing theories on the impact of the Islamic religion on short-term versus long-term debt preferences. However, the findings concerning the lack of an impact of the Islamic religion on total debt preferences are surprising and contrary to existing theories. Practical implications – Firms in Muslim countries appear to have the flexibility to adopt overall leverage ratios comparable to those in non-Muslim countries. However, firms in Muslim countries may be disadvantaged in that there appear to be impediments to the use of long-term debt. Originality/value – This paper presents one of the first empirical studies of the impact of the Muslim religion on corporate financing choices across a large cross-section of firms in Muslim and non-Muslim countries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management Emerald Publishing

A comparative analysis of the implications of the Islamic religion on corporate capital structures of firms in emerging market countries

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1753-8394
DOI
10.1108/IMEFM-02-2013-0025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the Muslim religion on firm capital structure. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare financing patterns in Muslim versus non-Muslim countries using 658 firms in 16 countries covering a period of seven years. Findings – No significant differences between Muslim and non-Muslim countries were found in terms of total debt ratios. However, significant differences were found in the choice of short-term versus long-term debt, with firms in Muslim countries showing a strong preference for short-term debt. Research limitations/implications – The findings confirm existing theories on the impact of the Islamic religion on short-term versus long-term debt preferences. However, the findings concerning the lack of an impact of the Islamic religion on total debt preferences are surprising and contrary to existing theories. Practical implications – Firms in Muslim countries appear to have the flexibility to adopt overall leverage ratios comparable to those in non-Muslim countries. However, firms in Muslim countries may be disadvantaged in that there appear to be impediments to the use of long-term debt. Originality/value – This paper presents one of the first empirical studies of the impact of the Muslim religion on corporate financing choices across a large cross-section of firms in Muslim and non-Muslim countries.

Journal

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 12, 2014

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