A community‐based framework for poverty alleviation: the case of post‐revolution Egypt

A community‐based framework for poverty alleviation: the case of post‐revolution Egypt Purpose – As with many rapidly growing developing nations that suffer from inequity and political oppression, popular rebellion has long been likely in Egypt. As uprisings burgeoned in 2008 and it became especially evident that a popular revolution was imminent, which made it crucial to detect the root causes of Egyptians' discontent. The purpose of this paper is two fold: to identify the main sources of socioeconomic predicaments of the economically deprived members of the Egyptian society, and to build a composite indicator of poverty (CIP) based on their preferences to act as a national benchmark for poverty alleviation. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was administered shortly before the eruption of the Egyptian Revolution. A series of regression models were run to uncover what Egyptians perceive to be the causes of poverty. Finally, a CIP was built to rank societal welfare preferences. The research culminates below in a proposed reform framework. Findings – The results of the CIP reveal that poverty was reduced to a reasonable degree, albeit that the deprivation of basic commodities and services increased popular discontent. The lowest socioeconomic groups blame poverty on structural fragility and the inefficacy of government policies, while middle‐income groups attribute poverty to personal incompetence. This legitimises the exclusive provision of social safety nets to lower income groups. Originality/value – By building a community‐based composite poverty index, this research pioneers a country‐specific CIP benchmark to measure advances in poverty alleviation according to the perceptions of the society. It could prove useful for developing nations encountering similar problems and impending mass rebellions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Social Economics Emerald Publishing

A community‐based framework for poverty alleviation: the case of post‐revolution Egypt

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/a-community-based-framework-for-poverty-alleviation-the-case-of-post-HfvvY0R68Z
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0306-8293
D.O.I.
10.1108/03068291211188884
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – As with many rapidly growing developing nations that suffer from inequity and political oppression, popular rebellion has long been likely in Egypt. As uprisings burgeoned in 2008 and it became especially evident that a popular revolution was imminent, which made it crucial to detect the root causes of Egyptians' discontent. The purpose of this paper is two fold: to identify the main sources of socioeconomic predicaments of the economically deprived members of the Egyptian society, and to build a composite indicator of poverty (CIP) based on their preferences to act as a national benchmark for poverty alleviation. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was administered shortly before the eruption of the Egyptian Revolution. A series of regression models were run to uncover what Egyptians perceive to be the causes of poverty. Finally, a CIP was built to rank societal welfare preferences. The research culminates below in a proposed reform framework. Findings – The results of the CIP reveal that poverty was reduced to a reasonable degree, albeit that the deprivation of basic commodities and services increased popular discontent. The lowest socioeconomic groups blame poverty on structural fragility and the inefficacy of government policies, while middle‐income groups attribute poverty to personal incompetence. This legitimises the exclusive provision of social safety nets to lower income groups. Originality/value – By building a community‐based composite poverty index, this research pioneers a country‐specific CIP benchmark to measure advances in poverty alleviation according to the perceptions of the society. It could prove useful for developing nations encountering similar problems and impending mass rebellions.

Journal

International Journal of Social EconomicsEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 16, 2011

Keywords: Egypt; Poverty; Social problems; Developing countries; Poverty alleviation; Equity; Human development

References

  • Measuring poverty changes with bounded equivalence scales: Australia in the 1980s
    Bradbury, B.
  • Poverty in developing nations: a cross‐cultural attributional analysis
    Hine, D.; Montiel, C.
  • Poverty, non‐white poverty, and the Sen index
    Hoover, G.A.; Formby, J.; Kim, H.
  • Ranking income distribution when needs differ
    Jenkins, S.P.; Lambert, P.J.
  • The implicit equidistributional bias of human development
    Luchters, G.; Menkhoff, L.
  • The human development index: some technical issues and alternative indices
    Noorbakhsh, F.
  • On measuring poverty
    Thon, D.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off