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A case for reducing salt in processed foods

A case for reducing salt in processed foods Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse of salt has led to adverse effects on health. The increasing consumption of convenience foods has contributed greatly to a high salt intake. Highly processed, convenience foods are known to contain large quantities of salt to optimise storage stability and flavour acceptability. Current high salt intakes have therefore been attributed to processed foods, accounting for 75-85 per cent of total salt intake. Such findings and associated health implications have prompted a call from health professionals and food researchers to reduce salt intake. Effective salt reduction, however, can only be achieved with the co-operation and commitment of the food industry in the development of lower-salt processed foods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

A case for reducing salt in processed foods

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References (34)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/00346650010329380
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse of salt has led to adverse effects on health. The increasing consumption of convenience foods has contributed greatly to a high salt intake. Highly processed, convenience foods are known to contain large quantities of salt to optimise storage stability and flavour acceptability. Current high salt intakes have therefore been attributed to processed foods, accounting for 75-85 per cent of total salt intake. Such findings and associated health implications have prompted a call from health professionals and food researchers to reduce salt intake. Effective salt reduction, however, can only be achieved with the co-operation and commitment of the food industry in the development of lower-salt processed foods.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2000

Keywords: Diet; Processed foods; Food manufacturing

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