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1,500,000 Square Feet of Safety Glass

1,500,000 Square Feet of Safety Glass August , 1929 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 203 1,500,000 Square Feet of Safety Glass Newl y Established Factory Manufacturing Glass for Aircraft Ha s Record Potential Annual Output E have previously alluded in these and it may, perhaps, be regarded as an indication th e Splintex Company claims to have succeeded columns to the creation of what in of the confidence in the future of this industry in manufacturing a safety glass which has W effect is a new sub-industry to the tha t one firm, the Splintex Safety Glass Com­ proved to be non-discolourable in all ordinary aircraft industry—that is, the manufacture of pany , has recently opened, at Wimbledon, a conditions of use. safety glass. Safety glass is being used to an new factory which is designed to be capable of Furthermore , because the "Acetat e sand­ increasing extent upon aircraft, although, of a n output of no less than 1½ million square feet wich" never dries or becomes brittle Splintex course, it is idle to pretend tha t th e demand from of safety, non-discolourable glass per year. Glass is always unsplinterable. th e air industry can ever hope to compete with Glass is such a prosaic substance, whether These few notes give just some bare facts on tha t from the automobile industry. of the safety or of the ordinary kind, that th e manufacture of safety glass, bu t are intended Nevertheless, th e increasing use and construc­ few of us realise what an enormous amount of deliberately to show that, as far as the aircraft tion of air liners with their large side windows, research is put into its manufacture, and industr y is concerned, there should be con­ particularly, of course, do these remarks apply specially arranged for the comfort of passengers, siderable room for development. The future t o safety glass. th e increase in construction of light aeroplanes of th e safety-glass industry depends firstly upon of limousine type, must all make their corre­ I t is interesting to recall that we must look th e large-scale development of transport avia­ sponding demands on the safety-glass con­ t o France for the first practical example of tion, and secondly upon the spread of luxury structin g industry. flying. safety glass. In 1909 Edouard Benedictus took out a paten t for safety glass formed of two Th e Technique of Manufacture sheets of glass united to an interposed sheet of For no longer is it considered desirable to celluloid. This patent and subsequent modi­ A British Air Survey Machine use mere sheets of celluloid in th e place of glass; fication was acquired and worked by the Th e Gloster Aircraft Company has completed this becomes dirty, buckles, cracks, and gener­ Société du Verre Triplex. Such celluloid to the order of the Aircraft Operating Company ally reduces good visibility. On th e other hand, glasses are manufactured to-day, with slight a "Survey" machine, which is shown in it is obviously ridiculously unsafe to use modifications, by various companies. These skeleton form at Olympia. The fuselage is in ordinary glass in any form of aircraft, and in modifications consist merely of the mode or three detachable sections. The front unit, this point the air industry differs from the material used to obtain adhesion, and they comprising the control cabin with a glass floor, motor-car industry. The motorist, if he var y further in th e way in which they re-act to is of duralumin square tube and channels chooses to risk it, may use ordinary glass; th e action of the sun's rays upon them after bolted together with flat plate fittings. The n o builder of an air liner would care to send long exposure. centre portion is of mixed duralumin and steel his ship into the air feeling that the tube , all of square section, with flat plates large windows which add so much to the Th e Process riveted and welded together. The rear section attractivenes s of the interior decoration were Wit h regard to the actual process of manu­ has four round steel tubular longerons with a protected by ordinary glass. facture, we may note that the majority of the but t joint in the middle, the struts being of patent s have some connection with the culinary On the other hand, for reasons mentioned round duralumin tube. The wings are of the above, he would scarcely care to use ordinary art, one calling for gelatine, another for sugar, Gloster patent lattice spar construction with celluloid. He is, therefore, forced to come to anothe r for eggs, another for milk, or cheese. Frise-type ailerons on the bottom plane only. one of the many companies which are rapidly All celluloid glasses of this type, it is claimed, The tail plane has box steel spars with duralu­ springing into existence for supplying this have a disadvantage in tha t the ultra violet rays min ribs. Two geared Bristol "Jupiter " XI demand . More than in any other branch of present in sunlight set up chemical action in the 465 h.p . engines are fitted. th e industry has the safety-glass industry celluloid, causing various degrees of deteriora­ Characteristics: Span, 61 feet. Length, shown a tendency to increase during the last tion, generally manifested by discoloration 48 ft. 6 ins. Height, 18 ft. 9 ins. Wing Sec­ yea r or so. Whether all these new-comers to and often leading to brittleness of the cellu­ tion, Clark Y.H. Area, 1,025 sq. ft. Weight, th e industry can " stay the course " is a matter loid. empty , 8,570 lbs. Normal load, 2,510 lbs. which time alone can show; much will depend Late r on in the development of safety-glass Weight, loaded, 11,080 lbs. upon the excellency of their product, and technique, various blue celluloids appeared on muc h also upon the vigour with which they Performance: Maximum speed, 131 m.p.h. th e market, and these promised to take longer marke t their wares. t o discolour by reason of the fact that blue is Speed at 20,000 feet, 114 m.p.h. Service th e opposite end of the spectrum to yellow. ceiling, 21,900 feet. Stalling speed, 47 m.p.h. There are, however, a number of first-class Absolute ceiling with normal load with one firms in this business whose experience in By means of a cellulose acetate material, for engine only running, 10,400 feet. supplying the aircraft industry is considerable, which a paten t was granted in September, 1924, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

1,500,000 Square Feet of Safety Glass

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 1 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1929

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029163
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Abstract

August , 1929 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 203 1,500,000 Square Feet of Safety Glass Newl y Established Factory Manufacturing Glass for Aircraft Ha s Record Potential Annual Output E have previously alluded in these and it may, perhaps, be regarded as an indication th e Splintex Company claims to have succeeded columns to the creation of what in of the confidence in the future of this industry in manufacturing a safety glass which has W effect is a new sub-industry to the tha t one firm, the Splintex Safety Glass Com­ proved to be non-discolourable in all ordinary aircraft industry—that is, the manufacture of pany , has recently opened, at Wimbledon, a conditions of use. safety glass. Safety glass is being used to an new factory which is designed to be capable of Furthermore , because the "Acetat e sand­ increasing extent upon aircraft, although, of a n output of no less than 1½ million square feet wich" never dries or becomes brittle Splintex course, it is idle to pretend tha t th e demand from of safety, non-discolourable glass per year. Glass is always unsplinterable. th e air industry can ever hope to compete with Glass is such a prosaic substance, whether These few notes give just some bare facts on tha t from the automobile industry. of the safety or of the ordinary kind, that th e manufacture of safety glass, bu t are intended Nevertheless, th e increasing use and construc­ few of us realise what an enormous amount of deliberately to show that, as far as the aircraft tion of air liners with their large side windows, research is put into its manufacture, and industr y is concerned, there should be con­ particularly, of course, do these remarks apply specially arranged for the comfort of passengers, siderable room for development. The future t o safety glass. th e increase in construction of light aeroplanes of th e safety-glass industry depends firstly upon of limousine type, must all make their corre­ I t is interesting to recall that we must look th e large-scale development of transport avia­ sponding demands on the safety-glass con­ t o France for the first practical example of tion, and secondly upon the spread of luxury structin g industry. flying. safety glass. In 1909 Edouard Benedictus took out a paten t for safety glass formed of two Th e Technique of Manufacture sheets of glass united to an interposed sheet of For no longer is it considered desirable to celluloid. This patent and subsequent modi­ A British Air Survey Machine use mere sheets of celluloid in th e place of glass; fication was acquired and worked by the Th e Gloster Aircraft Company has completed this becomes dirty, buckles, cracks, and gener­ Société du Verre Triplex. Such celluloid to the order of the Aircraft Operating Company ally reduces good visibility. On th e other hand, glasses are manufactured to-day, with slight a "Survey" machine, which is shown in it is obviously ridiculously unsafe to use modifications, by various companies. These skeleton form at Olympia. The fuselage is in ordinary glass in any form of aircraft, and in modifications consist merely of the mode or three detachable sections. The front unit, this point the air industry differs from the material used to obtain adhesion, and they comprising the control cabin with a glass floor, motor-car industry. The motorist, if he var y further in th e way in which they re-act to is of duralumin square tube and channels chooses to risk it, may use ordinary glass; th e action of the sun's rays upon them after bolted together with flat plate fittings. The n o builder of an air liner would care to send long exposure. centre portion is of mixed duralumin and steel his ship into the air feeling that the tube , all of square section, with flat plates large windows which add so much to the Th e Process riveted and welded together. The rear section attractivenes s of the interior decoration were Wit h regard to the actual process of manu­ has four round steel tubular longerons with a protected by ordinary glass. facture, we may note that the majority of the but t joint in the middle, the struts being of patent s have some connection with the culinary On the other hand, for reasons mentioned round duralumin tube. The wings are of the above, he would scarcely care to use ordinary art, one calling for gelatine, another for sugar, Gloster patent lattice spar construction with celluloid. He is, therefore, forced to come to anothe r for eggs, another for milk, or cheese. Frise-type ailerons on the bottom plane only. one of the many companies which are rapidly All celluloid glasses of this type, it is claimed, The tail plane has box steel spars with duralu­ springing into existence for supplying this have a disadvantage in tha t the ultra violet rays min ribs. Two geared Bristol "Jupiter " XI demand . More than in any other branch of present in sunlight set up chemical action in the 465 h.p . engines are fitted. th e industry has the safety-glass industry celluloid, causing various degrees of deteriora­ Characteristics: Span, 61 feet. Length, shown a tendency to increase during the last tion, generally manifested by discoloration 48 ft. 6 ins. Height, 18 ft. 9 ins. Wing Sec­ yea r or so. Whether all these new-comers to and often leading to brittleness of the cellu­ tion, Clark Y.H. Area, 1,025 sq. ft. Weight, th e industry can " stay the course " is a matter loid. empty , 8,570 lbs. Normal load, 2,510 lbs. which time alone can show; much will depend Late r on in the development of safety-glass Weight, loaded, 11,080 lbs. upon the excellency of their product, and technique, various blue celluloids appeared on muc h also upon the vigour with which they Performance: Maximum speed, 131 m.p.h. th e market, and these promised to take longer marke t their wares. t o discolour by reason of the fact that blue is Speed at 20,000 feet, 114 m.p.h. Service th e opposite end of the spectrum to yellow. ceiling, 21,900 feet. Stalling speed, 47 m.p.h. There are, however, a number of first-class Absolute ceiling with normal load with one firms in this business whose experience in By means of a cellulose acetate material, for engine only running, 10,400 feet. supplying the aircraft industry is considerable, which a paten t was granted in September, 1924,

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1929

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