Wound healing in the eye: Therapeutic prospects

Wound healing in the eye: Therapeutic prospects In order to maintain a smooth optical surface the corneal epithelium has to continuously renew itself so as to maintain its function as a barrier to fluctuating external surroundings and various environmental insults. After trauma, the cornea typically re-epithelializes promptly thereby minimizing the risk of infection, opacification or perforation. A persistent epithelial defect (PED) is usually referred to as a non-healing epithelial lesion after approximately two weeks of treatment with standard therapies to no avail. They occur following exposure to toxic agents, mechanical injury, and ocular surface infections and are associated with significant clinical morbidity in patients, resulting in discomfort or visual loss. In the case of deeper corneal injury and corneal pathology the wound healing cascade can also extend to the corneal stroma, the layer below the epithelium. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, pharmaco-therapeutic agents that promote corneal healing remain limited. This article serves as a review of current standard therapies, recently introduced alternative therapies gaining in popularity, and a look into the newest developments into ocular wound healing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews Elsevier

Wound healing in the eye: Therapeutic prospects

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0169-409x
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.addr.2018.01.006
Publisher site
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Abstract

In order to maintain a smooth optical surface the corneal epithelium has to continuously renew itself so as to maintain its function as a barrier to fluctuating external surroundings and various environmental insults. After trauma, the cornea typically re-epithelializes promptly thereby minimizing the risk of infection, opacification or perforation. A persistent epithelial defect (PED) is usually referred to as a non-healing epithelial lesion after approximately two weeks of treatment with standard therapies to no avail. They occur following exposure to toxic agents, mechanical injury, and ocular surface infections and are associated with significant clinical morbidity in patients, resulting in discomfort or visual loss. In the case of deeper corneal injury and corneal pathology the wound healing cascade can also extend to the corneal stroma, the layer below the epithelium. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, pharmaco-therapeutic agents that promote corneal healing remain limited. This article serves as a review of current standard therapies, recently introduced alternative therapies gaining in popularity, and a look into the newest developments into ocular wound healing.

Journal

Advanced Drug Delivery ReviewsElsevier

Published: Feb 15, 2018

References

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