Why do we multitask with media? Predictors of media multitasking among Internet users in the United States and Taiwan

Why do we multitask with media? Predictors of media multitasking among Internet users in the... 1 Introduction</h5> With the development of new technologies that offer consumers numerous ways to satisfy needs in information, communication, and entertainment, media multitasking has become an important object of exploration. While new, increasingly interactive electronic media provide individuals with terabytes of content, they also fight for people’s time and attention. Although having unlimited media options, humans have limited time to process information they receive from multiple sources on a daily basis. Thus, they often multitask.</P>The habit of multitasking with media has increased significantly during 2000s with the growing uses of information and communication technologies (ICT; Roberts, Foehr, & Rideout, 2005 ). The growing body of literature on the topic focuses on three main areas: media multitasking patterns ( Foehr, 2006; Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010 ), antecedents ( Jeong & Fishbein, 2007; Wang & Tchernev, 2012 ), and effects (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Zhang, Jeong, & Fishbein, 2010 ). Research about the patterns of media multitasking describes what media uses and other activities people tend to combine; and studies about antecedents and effects explore media multitasking predictors and outcomes. The outcomes of multitasking with media have been examined in multiple studies (e.g., Armstrong & Chung, 2000; Bowman, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers in Human Behavior Elsevier

Why do we multitask with media? Predictors of media multitasking among Internet users in the United States and Taiwan

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0747-5632
DOI
10.1016/j.chb.2015.03.052
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> With the development of new technologies that offer consumers numerous ways to satisfy needs in information, communication, and entertainment, media multitasking has become an important object of exploration. While new, increasingly interactive electronic media provide individuals with terabytes of content, they also fight for people’s time and attention. Although having unlimited media options, humans have limited time to process information they receive from multiple sources on a daily basis. Thus, they often multitask.</P>The habit of multitasking with media has increased significantly during 2000s with the growing uses of information and communication technologies (ICT; Roberts, Foehr, & Rideout, 2005 ). The growing body of literature on the topic focuses on three main areas: media multitasking patterns ( Foehr, 2006; Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010 ), antecedents ( Jeong & Fishbein, 2007; Wang & Tchernev, 2012 ), and effects (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Zhang, Jeong, & Fishbein, 2010 ). Research about the patterns of media multitasking describes what media uses and other activities people tend to combine; and studies about antecedents and effects explore media multitasking predictors and outcomes. The outcomes of multitasking with media have been examined in multiple studies (e.g., Armstrong & Chung, 2000; Bowman,

Journal

Computers in Human BehaviorElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2015

References

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