Who blogs? Personality predictors of blogging

Who blogs? Personality predictors of blogging The Big Five personality inventory measures personality based on five key traits: neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness, openness to experience, and conscientiousness ( Costa, P. T., Jr., & McCrae, R. R. (1992). Normal personality assessment in clinical practice: The NEO Personality Inventory. Psychological Assessment 4 , 5–13 ). There is a growing body of evidence indicating that individual differences on the Big Five factors are associated with different types of Internet usage (Amichai-Hamburger, Y., & Ben-Artzi, E. (2003). Loneliness and Internet use. Computers in Human Behavior 19 , 71–80; Hamburger, Y. A., & Ben-Artzi, E. (2000). Relationship between extraversion and neuroticism and the different uses of the Internet. Computers in Human Behavior 16 , 441–449). Two studies sought to extend this research to a relatively new online format for expression: blogging. Specifically, we examined whether the different Big Five traits predicted blogging. The results of two studies indicate that people who are high in openness to new experience and high in neuroticism are likely to be bloggers. Additionally, the neuroticism relationship was moderated by gender indicating that women who are high in neuroticism are more likely to be bloggers as compared to those low in neuroticism whereas there was no difference for men. These results indicate that personality factors impact the likelihood of being a blogger and have implications for understanding who blogs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers in Human Behavior Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0747-5632
DOI
10.1016/j.chb.2007.09.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Big Five personality inventory measures personality based on five key traits: neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness, openness to experience, and conscientiousness ( Costa, P. T., Jr., & McCrae, R. R. (1992). Normal personality assessment in clinical practice: The NEO Personality Inventory. Psychological Assessment 4 , 5–13 ). There is a growing body of evidence indicating that individual differences on the Big Five factors are associated with different types of Internet usage (Amichai-Hamburger, Y., & Ben-Artzi, E. (2003). Loneliness and Internet use. Computers in Human Behavior 19 , 71–80; Hamburger, Y. A., & Ben-Artzi, E. (2000). Relationship between extraversion and neuroticism and the different uses of the Internet. Computers in Human Behavior 16 , 441–449). Two studies sought to extend this research to a relatively new online format for expression: blogging. Specifically, we examined whether the different Big Five traits predicted blogging. The results of two studies indicate that people who are high in openness to new experience and high in neuroticism are likely to be bloggers. Additionally, the neuroticism relationship was moderated by gender indicating that women who are high in neuroticism are more likely to be bloggers as compared to those low in neuroticism whereas there was no difference for men. These results indicate that personality factors impact the likelihood of being a blogger and have implications for understanding who blogs.

Journal

Computers in Human BehaviorElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2008

References

  • Internet and personality
    Amichai-Hamburger, Y.
  • Loneliness and Internet use
    Amichai-Hamburger, Y.; Ben-Artzi, E.
  • The Internet and Social Life
    Bargh, J.; McKenna, K.
  • Personality structure: Emergence of the five-factor model
    Digman, J.M.
  • Relationship between extraversion and neuroticism and the different uses of the Internet
    Hamburger, Y.A.; Ben-Artzi, E.
  • Weblogs as bridging genre
    Herring, S.C.; Scheidt, L.A.; Wright, E.; Bonus, S.
  • Self-disclosure in computer mediated communication: The role of self-awareness and visual anonymity
    Joinson, A.N.

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