Water storage and evaporation as constituents of rainfall interception

Water storage and evaporation as constituents of rainfall interception Intercepted rainfall may be evaporated during or after the rain event. Intercepted rain is generally determined as the difference between rainfall measurements outside and inside the forest. Such measurements are often used to discriminate between water storage and evaporation during rain as well. Two well-accepted methods underestimate water storage by a factor two as compared to direct observations. The underestimation of storage is compensated by an overestimation of evaporation during rain by a factor of three. The direct observations of water storage and evaporation appear to agree with previous direct observations. Thus, it is concluded that these observations are representative. Also, our results based on methods using only rainfall measurements inside and outside the forest appear to agree with previous results. This would result in the conclusion that the common methods systematically underestimate water storage and overestimate evaporation during rain. Indeed, the systematic errors can be explained by the neglect of drainage before saturation. Water storage is better simulated assuming an exponential saturation of a larger storage capacity. A smaller evaporation can be simulated using an appropriate resistance to vapour transport. The observations in dense coniferous forest showed water storage to be the dominant process in rainfall interception, but this conclusion should not be generalized to other forests and climates. Direct observations of water storage and evaporation are recommended to build a realistic set of parameters for rainfall interception studies of the main vegetation types. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrology Elsevier

Water storage and evaporation as constituents of rainfall interception

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0022-1694
eISSN
1879-2707
DOI
10.1016/S0022-1694(98)00200-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Intercepted rainfall may be evaporated during or after the rain event. Intercepted rain is generally determined as the difference between rainfall measurements outside and inside the forest. Such measurements are often used to discriminate between water storage and evaporation during rain as well. Two well-accepted methods underestimate water storage by a factor two as compared to direct observations. The underestimation of storage is compensated by an overestimation of evaporation during rain by a factor of three. The direct observations of water storage and evaporation appear to agree with previous direct observations. Thus, it is concluded that these observations are representative. Also, our results based on methods using only rainfall measurements inside and outside the forest appear to agree with previous results. This would result in the conclusion that the common methods systematically underestimate water storage and overestimate evaporation during rain. Indeed, the systematic errors can be explained by the neglect of drainage before saturation. Water storage is better simulated assuming an exponential saturation of a larger storage capacity. A smaller evaporation can be simulated using an appropriate resistance to vapour transport. The observations in dense coniferous forest showed water storage to be the dominant process in rainfall interception, but this conclusion should not be generalized to other forests and climates. Direct observations of water storage and evaporation are recommended to build a realistic set of parameters for rainfall interception studies of the main vegetation types.

Journal

Journal of HydrologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1998

References

  • An analytical model of rainfall interception by forests
    Gash, J.H.C.
  • Estimating sparse forest rainfall interception with an analytical model
    Gash, J.H.C.; Lloyd, C.R.; Lachaud, G.
  • Rainfall interception near a forest edge
    Klaassen, W.; Lankreijer, H.J.M.; Veen, A.W.L.
  • Nighttime, wet canopy evaporation rates and the water balance of an evergreen mixed forest
    Pearce, A.J.; Rowe, L.K.; Stewart, J.B.
  • The effect of intercepted rainfall on the water balance of a hardwood forest
    Singh, B.; Szeicz, G.
  • Evaporation from the wet canopy of a pine forest
    Stewart, J.B.

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