Visual target detection is not impaired in dyslexic readers

Visual target detection is not impaired in dyslexic readers In two previous studies we assessed a difficulty of dyslexic readers with letter string processing by using variants of the partial report paradigm, e.g., Averbach and Coriell (Averbach, E., & Coriell, A. S. (1961). Short-term memory in vision. Bell Systems Technical Journal, 40 , 309–328) which requires report of a letter name in response to a position cue. The poor dyslexic performance was interpreted as evidence for a visual-attentional deficit of dyslexic readers. In the present study, we avoided verbal report by using a task which only required the detection of predefined targets (letters or pseudoletters) in strings. On this purely visual task, the dyslexic readers did not differ from non-impaired readers. This finding speaks against a basic visual-attentional deficit; rather it suggests that the dyslexic deficit on partial report paradigms stems from a problem in establishing a string representation which includes position and name codes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vision Research Elsevier

Visual target detection is not impaired in dyslexic readers

Vision Research, Volume 48 (6) – Mar 1, 2008

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0042-6989
eISSN
1878-5646
DOI
10.1016/j.visres.2007.11.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In two previous studies we assessed a difficulty of dyslexic readers with letter string processing by using variants of the partial report paradigm, e.g., Averbach and Coriell (Averbach, E., & Coriell, A. S. (1961). Short-term memory in vision. Bell Systems Technical Journal, 40 , 309–328) which requires report of a letter name in response to a position cue. The poor dyslexic performance was interpreted as evidence for a visual-attentional deficit of dyslexic readers. In the present study, we avoided verbal report by using a task which only required the detection of predefined targets (letters or pseudoletters) in strings. On this purely visual task, the dyslexic readers did not differ from non-impaired readers. This finding speaks against a basic visual-attentional deficit; rather it suggests that the dyslexic deficit on partial report paradigms stems from a problem in establishing a string representation which includes position and name codes.

Journal

Vision ResearchElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2008

References

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