Variations and controls on crustal thermal regimes in Southeastern Australia

Variations and controls on crustal thermal regimes in Southeastern Australia The surface heat flow field in Australia has for many years been poorly constrained compared to continental regions elsewhere. 182 recent heat flow determinations and 66 new heat production measurements for Southeastern Australia significantly increase our understanding of local and regional lithospheric thermal regimes and allow for detailed thermal modelling. The new data give a mean surface heat flow for Victoria of 71 ± 15mWm-2 which fits within the 61–77mWm-2 range reported for Phanerozoic-aged crust globally. These data reveal three new thermally and compositionally distinct heat flow sub-provinces within the previously defined Eastern Heat Flow Province: the Delamerian heat flow sub-province (average surface heat flow 60 ± 9mWm-2); the Lachlan heat flow sub-province (average surface heat flow 74 ± 13mWm-2); and the Newer Volcanics heat flow sub-province (average surface heat flow 72 ± 16mWm-2) which includes extreme values that locally exceed 100mWm-2. Inversions of reduced heat flow and crustal differentiation find that the Delamerian sub-province has experienced significant crustal reworking compared to the Lachlan and Newer Volcanics sub-provinces. The latter has experienced volcanism within the last 8Ma and the degree of variability observed in surface heat flow points (up to 8mWm-2 per kilometre laterally) cannot be replicated with steady-state thermal models through this sub-province. In the absence of a strong palaeoclimate signal, aquifer disturbances, or highly enriched granites, we suggest that this high variability arises from localised transient perturbations to the upper crust associated with recent intraplate volcanism. This is supported by a strong spatial correlation of high surface heat flow and known eruption points within the Newer Volcanics heat flow sub-province. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tectonophysics Elsevier

Variations and controls on crustal thermal regimes in Southeastern Australia

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0040-1951
eISSN
1879-3266
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.tecto.2017.12.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The surface heat flow field in Australia has for many years been poorly constrained compared to continental regions elsewhere. 182 recent heat flow determinations and 66 new heat production measurements for Southeastern Australia significantly increase our understanding of local and regional lithospheric thermal regimes and allow for detailed thermal modelling. The new data give a mean surface heat flow for Victoria of 71 ± 15mWm-2 which fits within the 61–77mWm-2 range reported for Phanerozoic-aged crust globally. These data reveal three new thermally and compositionally distinct heat flow sub-provinces within the previously defined Eastern Heat Flow Province: the Delamerian heat flow sub-province (average surface heat flow 60 ± 9mWm-2); the Lachlan heat flow sub-province (average surface heat flow 74 ± 13mWm-2); and the Newer Volcanics heat flow sub-province (average surface heat flow 72 ± 16mWm-2) which includes extreme values that locally exceed 100mWm-2. Inversions of reduced heat flow and crustal differentiation find that the Delamerian sub-province has experienced significant crustal reworking compared to the Lachlan and Newer Volcanics sub-provinces. The latter has experienced volcanism within the last 8Ma and the degree of variability observed in surface heat flow points (up to 8mWm-2 per kilometre laterally) cannot be replicated with steady-state thermal models through this sub-province. In the absence of a strong palaeoclimate signal, aquifer disturbances, or highly enriched granites, we suggest that this high variability arises from localised transient perturbations to the upper crust associated with recent intraplate volcanism. This is supported by a strong spatial correlation of high surface heat flow and known eruption points within the Newer Volcanics heat flow sub-province.

Journal

TectonophysicsElsevier

Published: Jan 16, 2018

References

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