Variation in the use of corridors by introduced and native rodents in South-Eastern Australia

Variation in the use of corridors by introduced and native rodents in South-Eastern Australia We examined the use of roadside corridors as habitat by introduced and Australian native rodents using a replicated sampling program that compared their abundance in remnant forest, two types of roadside corridor and pasture. Introduced rodents were most abundant in either the corridors (black rat Rattus rattus ) or in the corridors and pastures (house mouse Mus musculus ), whereas forests were favoured by the native bush rat Rattus fuscipes . For all species, the density of different age-classes varied between the habitats. Additionally, there was interspecific and intraspecific (age-class) variation in the number of males to females in each habitat, and adult female bush rats in corridors weighed less than those in forests. These data indicate that some introduced species may be more prominent in corridors than native taxa, and highlight the importance of considering intraspecific as well as interspecific variation in corridor use when evaluating the role of corridors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Variation in the use of corridors by introduced and native rodents in South-Eastern Australia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/variation-in-the-use-of-corridors-by-introduced-and-native-rodents-in-jvBLEDUC86
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0006-3207(97)00031-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined the use of roadside corridors as habitat by introduced and Australian native rodents using a replicated sampling program that compared their abundance in remnant forest, two types of roadside corridor and pasture. Introduced rodents were most abundant in either the corridors (black rat Rattus rattus ) or in the corridors and pastures (house mouse Mus musculus ), whereas forests were favoured by the native bush rat Rattus fuscipes . For all species, the density of different age-classes varied between the habitats. Additionally, there was interspecific and intraspecific (age-class) variation in the number of males to females in each habitat, and adult female bush rats in corridors weighed less than those in forests. These data indicate that some introduced species may be more prominent in corridors than native taxa, and highlight the importance of considering intraspecific as well as interspecific variation in corridor use when evaluating the role of corridors.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1997

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off