Using the PCR–RFLP method to identify the species of different processed products of billfish meats

Using the PCR–RFLP method to identify the species of different processed products of billfish... A polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) method had been developed for the detection of five billfish species Xiphias gladius , Makaira nigricans , M. indica , Istiophorus platypterus and Tetrapturus audax in raw, frozen and heat-treated meats. The primers L-CYTBF and H-CYTBF were designed in the mitochondrial cytochrome b ( cytb ) gene and the molecular weight of amplified fragment was 348 bp and amplified the fragment from processed billfish meats. The results obtained from the Bsa JI, Cac 8I and Hpa II enzymes digestion could be used to distinguish the five billfish species in frozen and heat-treated meats. Using the PCR–RFLP method, species of 10 commercial samples including raw fish fillets, frozen fish meats and fried fish meats could be identified. It was determined that two commercial samples of billfish products were not made from billfish. The method is sensitive, rapid and valid to detect fraudulent billfish products substituted from cheaper fish. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Control Elsevier

Using the PCR–RFLP method to identify the species of different processed products of billfish meats

Food Control, Volume 18 (4) – May 1, 2007

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0956-7135
eISSN
1873-7129
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodcont.2005.11.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) method had been developed for the detection of five billfish species Xiphias gladius , Makaira nigricans , M. indica , Istiophorus platypterus and Tetrapturus audax in raw, frozen and heat-treated meats. The primers L-CYTBF and H-CYTBF were designed in the mitochondrial cytochrome b ( cytb ) gene and the molecular weight of amplified fragment was 348 bp and amplified the fragment from processed billfish meats. The results obtained from the Bsa JI, Cac 8I and Hpa II enzymes digestion could be used to distinguish the five billfish species in frozen and heat-treated meats. Using the PCR–RFLP method, species of 10 commercial samples including raw fish fillets, frozen fish meats and fried fish meats could be identified. It was determined that two commercial samples of billfish products were not made from billfish. The method is sensitive, rapid and valid to detect fraudulent billfish products substituted from cheaper fish.

Journal

Food ControlElsevier

Published: May 1, 2007

References

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