Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with birth outcomes

Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with... Triclosan (TCS) is a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical which is widely used in consumer products as an antibacterial agent. But findings in human studies focusing on the fetal developmental effects of prenatal TCS exposure were rare and inconsistent. This study aimed to determine maternal urinary TCS and investigate its association with birth outcomes. Pregnant women (n = 1006) were randomly selected from the prospective Healthy Baby Cohort (HBC) enrolled in 2014. TCS levels were determined in maternal urine samples collected at delivery and recorded birth outcomes were obtained from the medical records. Multiple linear regressions were applied to evaluate associations of maternal urinary TCS levels with birth outcomes including birth weight, birth length, and gestational age. Logistic regressions were used to evaluate associations with preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight. The geometric mean concentrations for TCS and specific gravity (SG) adjusted TCS in maternal urines were 0.73, 0.78 ng/mL, respectively. In the crude model, one ln-unit increase of urinary SG-adjusted TCS concentration was associated with a 0.30-day [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.00, 0.60] increase in gestational age; however, the associations were not statistically significant after adjustment for covariates. No significant associations of SG-adjusted TCS concentrations with birth weight and birth length were observed. Maternal SG-adjusted TCS concentrations were not related to preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight (all p > 0.10). Our findings reported a relatively low level of TCS among Chinese pregnant women. With such exposure level, we did not find strong evidence for associations between maternal TCS exposure and birth outcomes. Longitudinal studies concerning about different potential effects of TCS on perinatal health are necessary. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with birth outcomes

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.08.073
Publisher site
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Abstract

Triclosan (TCS) is a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical which is widely used in consumer products as an antibacterial agent. But findings in human studies focusing on the fetal developmental effects of prenatal TCS exposure were rare and inconsistent. This study aimed to determine maternal urinary TCS and investigate its association with birth outcomes. Pregnant women (n = 1006) were randomly selected from the prospective Healthy Baby Cohort (HBC) enrolled in 2014. TCS levels were determined in maternal urine samples collected at delivery and recorded birth outcomes were obtained from the medical records. Multiple linear regressions were applied to evaluate associations of maternal urinary TCS levels with birth outcomes including birth weight, birth length, and gestational age. Logistic regressions were used to evaluate associations with preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight. The geometric mean concentrations for TCS and specific gravity (SG) adjusted TCS in maternal urines were 0.73, 0.78 ng/mL, respectively. In the crude model, one ln-unit increase of urinary SG-adjusted TCS concentration was associated with a 0.30-day [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.00, 0.60] increase in gestational age; however, the associations were not statistically significant after adjustment for covariates. No significant associations of SG-adjusted TCS concentrations with birth weight and birth length were observed. Maternal SG-adjusted TCS concentrations were not related to preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight (all p > 0.10). Our findings reported a relatively low level of TCS among Chinese pregnant women. With such exposure level, we did not find strong evidence for associations between maternal TCS exposure and birth outcomes. Longitudinal studies concerning about different potential effects of TCS on perinatal health are necessary.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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