Unhealthy foods taste better among children with lower self-control

Unhealthy foods taste better among children with lower self-control Self-control is important for healthy eating. Achieving and maintaining healthy eating behaviors can be challenging for children. Susceptibility to palatable unhealthy foods with high sugar, fat, and/or salt is a biologically predisposed, dominant response that can hinder healthy eating decisions. Self-control can help adults to build automatized strategies for resisting susceptibility to unhealthy foods. Likewise, if self-control helps children to learn strategies for resisting susceptibility to unhealthy foods, susceptibility to unhealthy foods would be demonstrated in children with low self-control. Specifically, the association between unhealthiness and tastiness (i.e., unhealthy foods taste better) is one of the important mechanisms underlying susceptibility to unhealthy foods. We expected susceptibility to unhealthy foods to be indicated by the association between unhealthiness and tastiness, as well as better taste perception of unhealthy foods and unhealthy food preferences. In our study, fifty-nine children aged 8–13 years reported their perceived self-control, and completed computerized food rating tasks measuring their healthiness, taste, and preference ratings on 30 healthy and 30 unhealthy foods. Results showed that children with lower self-control demonstrated heightened susceptibility to unhealthy foods, but children with higher self-control did not. Our findings suggested that higher levels of self-control would help children to develop healthy eating strategies for regulating dispositional susceptibility to unhealthy foods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

Unhealthy foods taste better among children with lower self-control

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/unhealthy-foods-taste-better-among-children-with-lower-self-control-5JsPUB00Dw
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
DOI
10.1016/j.appet.2019.04.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Self-control is important for healthy eating. Achieving and maintaining healthy eating behaviors can be challenging for children. Susceptibility to palatable unhealthy foods with high sugar, fat, and/or salt is a biologically predisposed, dominant response that can hinder healthy eating decisions. Self-control can help adults to build automatized strategies for resisting susceptibility to unhealthy foods. Likewise, if self-control helps children to learn strategies for resisting susceptibility to unhealthy foods, susceptibility to unhealthy foods would be demonstrated in children with low self-control. Specifically, the association between unhealthiness and tastiness (i.e., unhealthy foods taste better) is one of the important mechanisms underlying susceptibility to unhealthy foods. We expected susceptibility to unhealthy foods to be indicated by the association between unhealthiness and tastiness, as well as better taste perception of unhealthy foods and unhealthy food preferences. In our study, fifty-nine children aged 8–13 years reported their perceived self-control, and completed computerized food rating tasks measuring their healthiness, taste, and preference ratings on 30 healthy and 30 unhealthy foods. Results showed that children with lower self-control demonstrated heightened susceptibility to unhealthy foods, but children with higher self-control did not. Our findings suggested that higher levels of self-control would help children to develop healthy eating strategies for regulating dispositional susceptibility to unhealthy foods.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2019

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off