Unconditioned and conditioned anxiogenic effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940 in the social interaction test

Unconditioned and conditioned anxiogenic effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940 in... In spite of the addictive properties of cannabinoids, under certain circumstances, they can evoke strong anxiogenic and aversive responses in humans and in animal tests of anxiety. Effects of different doses of CP 55,940 (10, 20, and 40 μg/kg) were tested in the low-light, familiar (LF) apparatus test condition of the social interaction test. The 40-μg/kg dose of CP 55,940 significantly decreased the time spent in social interaction, indicating an anxiogenic effect. This dose also had an independent effect of reducing locomotor activity. In rats tested undrugged 24 h after testing with 40 μg/kg, there was a significant anxiogenic effect, indicating conditioned anxiety. The group of rats injected with 40 μg/kg immediately after the social interaction test showed an unexpected significant anxiolytic effect when tested undrugged 24 h later. In an additional experiment, rats were tested in the high-light, familiar (HF) apparatus test condition after 10 or 40 μg/kg, and only those that were tested after 40 μg/kg showed an anxiogenic effect on the test day and a conditioned anxiogenic effect when tested undrugged 24 h later. Once again, those injected with 40 μg/kg after the social interaction test displayed an anxiolytic effect when tested undrugged 24 h later. We provide the first evidence for unconditioned and conditioned anxiogenic-like responses to a cannabinoid agonist in the social interaction test. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Elsevier

Unconditioned and conditioned anxiogenic effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940 in the social interaction test

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0091-3057
eISSN
1873-5177
DOI
10.1016/j.pbb.2003.12.019
pmid
15006468
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In spite of the addictive properties of cannabinoids, under certain circumstances, they can evoke strong anxiogenic and aversive responses in humans and in animal tests of anxiety. Effects of different doses of CP 55,940 (10, 20, and 40 μg/kg) were tested in the low-light, familiar (LF) apparatus test condition of the social interaction test. The 40-μg/kg dose of CP 55,940 significantly decreased the time spent in social interaction, indicating an anxiogenic effect. This dose also had an independent effect of reducing locomotor activity. In rats tested undrugged 24 h after testing with 40 μg/kg, there was a significant anxiogenic effect, indicating conditioned anxiety. The group of rats injected with 40 μg/kg immediately after the social interaction test showed an unexpected significant anxiolytic effect when tested undrugged 24 h later. In an additional experiment, rats were tested in the high-light, familiar (HF) apparatus test condition after 10 or 40 μg/kg, and only those that were tested after 40 μg/kg showed an anxiogenic effect on the test day and a conditioned anxiogenic effect when tested undrugged 24 h later. Once again, those injected with 40 μg/kg after the social interaction test displayed an anxiolytic effect when tested undrugged 24 h later. We provide the first evidence for unconditioned and conditioned anxiogenic-like responses to a cannabinoid agonist in the social interaction test.

Journal

Pharmacology Biochemistry and BehaviorElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2004

References

  • Cannabinoid effects on anxiety-related behaviours and hypothalamic neurotransmitters
    Arévalo, C.; De Miguel, R.; Hernández-Tristán, R.
  • Hippocampal and septal injections of nicotine and 8-OH-DPAT distinguish among different animal tests of anxiety
    Cheeta, S.; Kenny, P.J.; File, S.E.
  • Conditioned increases in anxiogenic-like behavior following exposure to contextual stimuli associated with cocaine are mediated by corticotropin-releasing factor
    DeVries, A.C.; Pert, A.
  • Can social interaction be used to measure anxiety?
    File, S.E.; Hyde, J.R.
  • A review of 25 years of the social interaction test
    File, S.E.; Seth, P.
  • Neurobiological mechanisms by which nicotine mediates different types of anxiety
    File, S.E.; Cheeta, S.; Kenny, P.J.
  • Aversive effects of the synthetic cannabinoid CP 55,940 in rats
    McGregor, I.S.; Issakidis, C.N.; Prior, G.

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