Two - phase heuristics for the k- club problem

Two - phase heuristics for the k- club problem 1 Introduction</h5> During the last decade, the use of network models has been steadily growing in a large number of areas, e. g ., social network analysis, computational biology, and financial information data mining, [1–5] .</P>In all these areas it is important to identify groups of elements that form clusters. The characterization of a cluster may be made from several standpoints. In some cases, the most important aspect is the number (or the proportion) of direct links between pairs of elements. In other cases, the most important feature is the number of hops that separate pairs of elements, i. e ., the number of intermediate elements that are needed to establish a connection between any two members. The former case can be addressed with density-based network models such as cliques, quasi-cliques, k -cores and k -plexes [6–13] . The latter case can be addressed with diameter-based network models such as k -clubs.</P>Given an undirected graph G = ( V , E ) and a pair of nodes u , v ∈ V , the distance d i s t G ( u , v ) is the minimum number of edges needed to link u and v in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers & Operations Research Elsevier

Two - phase heuristics for the k- club problem

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0305-0548
eISSN
1873-765X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cor.2014.07.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> During the last decade, the use of network models has been steadily growing in a large number of areas, e. g ., social network analysis, computational biology, and financial information data mining, [1–5] .</P>In all these areas it is important to identify groups of elements that form clusters. The characterization of a cluster may be made from several standpoints. In some cases, the most important aspect is the number (or the proportion) of direct links between pairs of elements. In other cases, the most important feature is the number of hops that separate pairs of elements, i. e ., the number of intermediate elements that are needed to establish a connection between any two members. The former case can be addressed with density-based network models such as cliques, quasi-cliques, k -cores and k -plexes [6–13] . The latter case can be addressed with diameter-based network models such as k -clubs.</P>Given an undirected graph G = ( V , E ) and a pair of nodes u , v ∈ V , the distance d i s t G ( u , v ) is the minimum number of edges needed to link u and v in

Journal

Computers & Operations ResearchElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2014

References

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