Tropical wildlife corridors: use of linear rainforest remnants by arboreal mammals

Tropical wildlife corridors: use of linear rainforest remnants by arboreal mammals In fragmented landscapes, linear forest remnants have the potential to provide habitat and movement corridors for wildlife. We used systematic spotlighting surveys to sample arboreal mammals in 36 linear rainforest remnants in tropical Queensland, Australia. The effects of corridor width, height, isolation, elevation, and floristic composition on mammals were assessed with multiple regression models. Six species were recorded during 108 surveys. The most vulnerable species, the lemuroid ringtail possum ( Hemibelideus lemuroides ), was found only in remnants comprised of primary rainforest that were linked to large tracts of continuous forest. Two other species, the Herbert River ringtail possum ( Pseudochirulus herbertensis ) and striped possum ( Dactylopsila trivirgata ), also favored corridors that were linked to forest tracts or fragments, with the former favoring high-diversity forest (primary forest or mixed regrowth) over low-diversity ( Acacia ) regrowth. Three other species, the coppery brushtail possum ( Trichosurus vulpecula ), green ringtail possum ( Pseudochirops archeri ), and Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo ( Dendrolagus lumholtzi ), occurred in both isolated and non-isolated remnants and both primary forest and regrowth. Our findings suggest that linear forest remnants that are floristically diverse (not Acacia -dominated regrowth) and at least 30–40 m width can function as habitat and probably movement corridors for most arboreal mammals in this region. The lemuroid ringtail, however, apparently requires corridors of primary rainforest of at least 200 m in width. Because the lemuroid ringtail is highly vulnerable to forest fragmentation, faunal corridors in this region should be designed wherever possible to meet its ecological requirements. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Tropical wildlife corridors: use of linear rainforest remnants by arboreal mammals

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0006-3207(99)00077-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In fragmented landscapes, linear forest remnants have the potential to provide habitat and movement corridors for wildlife. We used systematic spotlighting surveys to sample arboreal mammals in 36 linear rainforest remnants in tropical Queensland, Australia. The effects of corridor width, height, isolation, elevation, and floristic composition on mammals were assessed with multiple regression models. Six species were recorded during 108 surveys. The most vulnerable species, the lemuroid ringtail possum ( Hemibelideus lemuroides ), was found only in remnants comprised of primary rainforest that were linked to large tracts of continuous forest. Two other species, the Herbert River ringtail possum ( Pseudochirulus herbertensis ) and striped possum ( Dactylopsila trivirgata ), also favored corridors that were linked to forest tracts or fragments, with the former favoring high-diversity forest (primary forest or mixed regrowth) over low-diversity ( Acacia ) regrowth. Three other species, the coppery brushtail possum ( Trichosurus vulpecula ), green ringtail possum ( Pseudochirops archeri ), and Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo ( Dendrolagus lumholtzi ), occurred in both isolated and non-isolated remnants and both primary forest and regrowth. Our findings suggest that linear forest remnants that are floristically diverse (not Acacia -dominated regrowth) and at least 30–40 m width can function as habitat and probably movement corridors for most arboreal mammals in this region. The lemuroid ringtail, however, apparently requires corridors of primary rainforest of at least 200 m in width. Because the lemuroid ringtail is highly vulnerable to forest fragmentation, faunal corridors in this region should be designed wherever possible to meet its ecological requirements.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1999

References

  • Linear strips of rain forest vegetation as potential dispersal corridors for rain forest insects
    Hill, C.J.
  • Ecological correlates of extinction proneness in Australian tropical rain forest mammals
    Laurance, W.F.
  • How to creatively fragment a landscape
    Laurance, W.F.; Gascon, C.
  • Australia's tree kangaroos: current issues in their conservation
    Newell, G.R.
  • Corridors in real landscapes: a reply to Simberloff and Cox
    Noss, R.F.

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