Tropical forest fragmentation and greenhouse gas emissions

Tropical forest fragmentation and greenhouse gas emissions Rainforest fragments in central Amazonia have been found to experience a marked loss of above-ground biomass caused by sharply increased rates of tree mortality and damage near fragment margins. These findings suggest that fragmentation of tropical forests is likely to increase emissions of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases above and beyond that caused by deforestation per se. We estimated committed carbon emissions from deforestation and fragmentation in Amazonia, using three simulated models of landscape change: a `Rondônia scenario,' which mimicked settlement schemes of small farmers in the southern Amazon; a `Pará scenario,' which imitated large cattle ranches in the eastern Amazon; and a `random scenario,' in which forest tracts were cleared randomly. Estimates of carbon emissions for specific landscapes were from 0.3 to 42% too low, depending on the amount and spatial pattern of clearing, when based solely on deforestation. Because they created irregular habitat edges or many forest perforations which increased tree mortality, the Rondônia and random-clearing scenarios produced 2–5 times more fragmentation-induced carbon emissions than did the Pará scenario, for any given level of clearing. Using current estimates of forest conversion, our simulations suggest that committed carbon emissions from forest fragmentation alone will range from 3.0 to 15.6 million t/year in the Brazilian Amazon, and from 22 to 149 million t/year for tropical forests globally. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forest Ecology and Management Elsevier

Tropical forest fragmentation and greenhouse gas emissions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/tropical-forest-fragmentation-and-greenhouse-gas-emissions-kYzLbkC0M5
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0378-1127
eISSN
1872-7042
DOI
10.1016/S0378-1127(98)00291-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rainforest fragments in central Amazonia have been found to experience a marked loss of above-ground biomass caused by sharply increased rates of tree mortality and damage near fragment margins. These findings suggest that fragmentation of tropical forests is likely to increase emissions of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases above and beyond that caused by deforestation per se. We estimated committed carbon emissions from deforestation and fragmentation in Amazonia, using three simulated models of landscape change: a `Rondônia scenario,' which mimicked settlement schemes of small farmers in the southern Amazon; a `Pará scenario,' which imitated large cattle ranches in the eastern Amazon; and a `random scenario,' in which forest tracts were cleared randomly. Estimates of carbon emissions for specific landscapes were from 0.3 to 42% too low, depending on the amount and spatial pattern of clearing, when based solely on deforestation. Because they created irregular habitat edges or many forest perforations which increased tree mortality, the Rondônia and random-clearing scenarios produced 2–5 times more fragmentation-induced carbon emissions than did the Pará scenario, for any given level of clearing. Using current estimates of forest conversion, our simulations suggest that committed carbon emissions from forest fragmentation alone will range from 3.0 to 15.6 million t/year in the Brazilian Amazon, and from 22 to 149 million t/year for tropical forests globally.

Journal

Forest Ecology and ManagementElsevier

Published: Oct 5, 1998

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off