Trichoderma asperellum cultured in reduced concentrations of synthetic medium retained dye decolourization efficacy

Trichoderma asperellum cultured in reduced concentrations of synthetic medium retained dye... Trichoderma asperellum (Ta) was first cultured in synthetic medium (Potato Dextrose Broth, PDB) of various concentrations (100, 75, 50, 25%). The biomass was harvested and inoculated into dye solutions (crystal violet, CV; methyl violet, MV; malachite green, MG; and cotton blue, CB). Reduced concentrations (20, 50, 75%) affected growth rate but their decolourization efficacies remained unaffected. This was attributed to similar numbers and types of functional groups (hydroxyl, amine, ester-lipid, alkane groups) found on the surface of fungal biomass, as revealed by the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Their production of NADH-reductase for degradation, and their biosorption activities were also unaffected. In general, Ta cultured in reduced concentrations (20, 50, 75%) retained the ability to perform biosorption and biodegradation, similar to cultures from control (100% PDB). This suggested that reduced nutrient levels (as a cost-feasible strategy) could be used to cultivate biomass of Ta for dye removal activities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Trichoderma asperellum cultured in reduced concentrations of synthetic medium retained dye decolourization efficacy

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.06.068
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Trichoderma asperellum (Ta) was first cultured in synthetic medium (Potato Dextrose Broth, PDB) of various concentrations (100, 75, 50, 25%). The biomass was harvested and inoculated into dye solutions (crystal violet, CV; methyl violet, MV; malachite green, MG; and cotton blue, CB). Reduced concentrations (20, 50, 75%) affected growth rate but their decolourization efficacies remained unaffected. This was attributed to similar numbers and types of functional groups (hydroxyl, amine, ester-lipid, alkane groups) found on the surface of fungal biomass, as revealed by the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Their production of NADH-reductase for degradation, and their biosorption activities were also unaffected. In general, Ta cultured in reduced concentrations (20, 50, 75%) retained the ability to perform biosorption and biodegradation, similar to cultures from control (100% PDB). This suggested that reduced nutrient levels (as a cost-feasible strategy) could be used to cultivate biomass of Ta for dye removal activities.

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2017

References

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