Trends in structuring edible emulsions with Pickering fat crystals

Trends in structuring edible emulsions with Pickering fat crystals 1 Introduction</h5> The traditional definition of a Pickering emulsion dates from the early 1900s when Ramsden [1] and Pickering [2] first explored particle-stabilized emulsions. The term ‘Pickering’ is now loosely used to represent any colloidal species that acts as a steric (mechanical) barrier against droplet–droplet coalescence and phase separation in oil-in-water (O/W), water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) or multiple emulsions [3 •• ,4 • ,5] . Within the past decade, Pickering emulsions have been increasingly ‘trending’, with interest in their attributes growing in fundamental physics (e.g., interactions between nanoparticles trapped at interfaces), new materials (e.g., liquid marbles, dry water, colloidosomes, etc.) and their potential for drugs and bioactive compound encapsulation and delivery.</P>Since the pioneering work of Lucassen-Reynders and van den Tempel on tristearin crystal-stabilized W/O emulsions in the 1960s [6 •• ] , there have been a number of advances in the stabilization of edible emulsions using fat-based species. In this light, this review explores three types of Pickering stabilization and proposes a nomenclature to delineate them ( Fig. 1 ). Type I is the most conventional mode of stabilization reported in the fat science literature and usually involves the direct interfacial solidification of surfactant monolayers or multilayers ( Fig. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science Elsevier

Trends in structuring edible emulsions with Pickering fat crystals

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1359-0294
eISSN
1879-0399
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cocis.2013.04.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The traditional definition of a Pickering emulsion dates from the early 1900s when Ramsden [1] and Pickering [2] first explored particle-stabilized emulsions. The term ‘Pickering’ is now loosely used to represent any colloidal species that acts as a steric (mechanical) barrier against droplet–droplet coalescence and phase separation in oil-in-water (O/W), water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) or multiple emulsions [3 •• ,4 • ,5] . Within the past decade, Pickering emulsions have been increasingly ‘trending’, with interest in their attributes growing in fundamental physics (e.g., interactions between nanoparticles trapped at interfaces), new materials (e.g., liquid marbles, dry water, colloidosomes, etc.) and their potential for drugs and bioactive compound encapsulation and delivery.</P>Since the pioneering work of Lucassen-Reynders and van den Tempel on tristearin crystal-stabilized W/O emulsions in the 1960s [6 •• ] , there have been a number of advances in the stabilization of edible emulsions using fat-based species. In this light, this review explores three types of Pickering stabilization and proposes a nomenclature to delineate them ( Fig. 1 ). Type I is the most conventional mode of stabilization reported in the fat science literature and usually involves the direct interfacial solidification of surfactant monolayers or multilayers ( Fig.

Journal

Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface ScienceElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2013

References

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