Trends in bromide wet deposition concentrations in the contiguous United States, 2001–2016

Trends in bromide wet deposition concentrations in the contiguous United States, 2001–2016 Bromide (Br−) and other solute concentration data from wet deposition samples collected and analyzed by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) from 2001 to 2016, were statistically analyzed for trends both geographically and temporally by precipitation type. Analysis was limited to NADP sites in the contiguous 48 United States. The Br− concentrations for this time period had a high number of values censored at the detection limits with greater than 86 percent of sample concentrations below analytical detection. Bromide was more frequently detected at NADP sites in coastal regions. Analysis using specialized statistical techniques for censored data revealed that Br− concentrations varied by precipitation type with higher concentrations usually observed in liquid versus precipitation containing snow. Negative temporal trends in Br− wet deposition concentrations were observed at a majority of NADP sites; approximately 25 percent of these trend values were statistically significant at less than 0.05 to 0.10 significance levels. Potential causes for the negative trends were explored, including annual and seasonal changes in precipitation depth, reduced emissions of methyl bromide (CH3Br) from coastal wetlands, and declining industrial use of bromine compounds. The results indicate that Br− in non-coastal wet-deposition comes mainly from long-range transport, not local sources. Correlations between Br−, chloride, and nitrate concentrations also were evaluated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Trends in bromide wet deposition concentrations in the contiguous United States, 2001–2016

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.10.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bromide (Br−) and other solute concentration data from wet deposition samples collected and analyzed by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) from 2001 to 2016, were statistically analyzed for trends both geographically and temporally by precipitation type. Analysis was limited to NADP sites in the contiguous 48 United States. The Br− concentrations for this time period had a high number of values censored at the detection limits with greater than 86 percent of sample concentrations below analytical detection. Bromide was more frequently detected at NADP sites in coastal regions. Analysis using specialized statistical techniques for censored data revealed that Br− concentrations varied by precipitation type with higher concentrations usually observed in liquid versus precipitation containing snow. Negative temporal trends in Br− wet deposition concentrations were observed at a majority of NADP sites; approximately 25 percent of these trend values were statistically significant at less than 0.05 to 0.10 significance levels. Potential causes for the negative trends were explored, including annual and seasonal changes in precipitation depth, reduced emissions of methyl bromide (CH3Br) from coastal wetlands, and declining industrial use of bromine compounds. The results indicate that Br− in non-coastal wet-deposition comes mainly from long-range transport, not local sources. Correlations between Br−, chloride, and nitrate concentrations also were evaluated.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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