Treatment readiness training and probationers' evaluation of substance abuse treatment in a criminal justice setting

Treatment readiness training and probationers' evaluation of substance abuse treatment in a... Clients who are legally coerced into substance abuse treatment often have low intrinsic motivation to participate, are less ready for treatment, and are consequently more problematic to treat and less satisfied with their treatment than are voluntary clients. A set of readiness training activities, designed to promote early involvement in treatment, was implemented in a 4-month residential criminal justice program. Five hundred probationers were randomly assigned to receive either the readiness training we developed or the approach typically used at the facility. Based on their response to an intake interview, probationers were categorized as having low, medium, or high readiness for treatment. Probationers in the readiness training group rated their counselors, groups, and community meetings higher than did probationers in the standard group. In addition, probationers in the readiness training group rated themselves as “working the program” to a greater extent than did probationers in the standard group. Probationers with higher initial levels of readiness for treatment rated their counselors, sessions, and security staff higher than did probationers with lower levels. The results suggest that the readiness training activities may help probationers become more involved in treatment and that this may lead to greater satisfaction with counselors and sessions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment Elsevier

Treatment readiness training and probationers' evaluation of substance abuse treatment in a criminal justice setting

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.
ISSN
0740-5472
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0740-5472(00)00139-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Clients who are legally coerced into substance abuse treatment often have low intrinsic motivation to participate, are less ready for treatment, and are consequently more problematic to treat and less satisfied with their treatment than are voluntary clients. A set of readiness training activities, designed to promote early involvement in treatment, was implemented in a 4-month residential criminal justice program. Five hundred probationers were randomly assigned to receive either the readiness training we developed or the approach typically used at the facility. Based on their response to an intake interview, probationers were categorized as having low, medium, or high readiness for treatment. Probationers in the readiness training group rated their counselors, groups, and community meetings higher than did probationers in the standard group. In addition, probationers in the readiness training group rated themselves as “working the program” to a greater extent than did probationers in the standard group. Probationers with higher initial levels of readiness for treatment rated their counselors, sessions, and security staff higher than did probationers with lower levels. The results suggest that the readiness training activities may help probationers become more involved in treatment and that this may lead to greater satisfaction with counselors and sessions.

Journal

Journal of Substance Abuse TreatmentElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2000

References

  • Peer, family, and motivational influences on drug treatment process and recidivism for probationers
    Broome, K.M.; Knight, K.; Hiller, M.; Simpson, D.D.
  • Effects of readiness for drug abuse treatment on client retention and assessment of process
    Joe, G.W.; Simpson, D.D.; Broome, K.M.
  • Recent research on the relationship between illicit drug use and crime
    Nurco, D.N.; Hanlon, T.E.; Kinlock, T.W.
  • Considering personal strengths: the effect of three methods on mood, arousal, and self-esteem
    Sia, T.L.; Czuchry, M.; Dansereau, D.F.

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