Treatment of toxic metal aqueous solutions: Encapsulation in a phosphate-calcium aluminate matrix

Treatment of toxic metal aqueous solutions: Encapsulation in a phosphate-calcium aluminate matrix 1 Introduction</h5> The release of toxic metals into the environment is a matter of growing concern for environmental stakeholders ( Shaheen et al., 2013; Gollmann et al., 2010 ). Different approaches have been used to address problems arising from spills into natural waters, industrial polluted sludge, slurries and soils, contaminated wastewaters and so on ( Devasena and Nambi, 2013; Diamantis et al., 2013 ).</P>One of the most widespread alternatives for handling toxic metal solutions is encapsulating them in manageable solid blocks that allow the proper solidification/stabilization (S/S) of hazardous components and their subsequent safe disposal in landfill sites ( Ucaroglu and Talinli, 2012 ). Among the binding materials used to form these solid blocks, cements have been proved to be suitable and cost-saving agents ( Ojovan et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2013; Pandey et al., 2012 ).</P>Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) has been widely studied as a good heavy metal retainer, but the use of other alternative binders is receiving growing attention. For instance, the use of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) to safely encapsulate hazardous materials has been recognized to be highly effective ( Navarro-Blasco et al., 2013 ). The relatively low pH of this kind of cement http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Treatment of toxic metal aqueous solutions: Encapsulation in a phosphate-calcium aluminate matrix

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/treatment-of-toxic-metal-aqueous-solutions-encapsulation-in-a-BWs2CNz9Mv
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The release of toxic metals into the environment is a matter of growing concern for environmental stakeholders ( Shaheen et al., 2013; Gollmann et al., 2010 ). Different approaches have been used to address problems arising from spills into natural waters, industrial polluted sludge, slurries and soils, contaminated wastewaters and so on ( Devasena and Nambi, 2013; Diamantis et al., 2013 ).</P>One of the most widespread alternatives for handling toxic metal solutions is encapsulating them in manageable solid blocks that allow the proper solidification/stabilization (S/S) of hazardous components and their subsequent safe disposal in landfill sites ( Ucaroglu and Talinli, 2012 ). Among the binding materials used to form these solid blocks, cements have been proved to be suitable and cost-saving agents ( Ojovan et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2013; Pandey et al., 2012 ).</P>Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) has been widely studied as a good heavy metal retainer, but the use of other alternative binders is receiving growing attention. For instance, the use of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) to safely encapsulate hazardous materials has been recognized to be highly effective ( Navarro-Blasco et al., 2013 ). The relatively low pH of this kind of cement

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off