Transpiration of natural rain forest and its dependence on climatic factors

Transpiration of natural rain forest and its dependence on climatic factors Sap flow was measured on several species from the tropical rain forest in French Guiana during two successive years over the dry season. On bright days, sap flow densities (i.e. sap flow per unit of sapwood area) exhibited high variations from one species to another. Higher rates (3 to 4 kg dim −2 h −1 ) were observed on late stage forest species like Dicorynia guianensis, Eperua falcata or E. grandifolia , and lower rates on Vouacapoua americana and Carapa procera (1.0 to 1.5 kg dm −2 h −1 ). Calculated stand sap flow ( F ) was closely dependant on air vapour pressure deficit and less correlated to global radiation. A simple model of canopy conductance variations and hence of stand transpiration was derived from these measurements. Sap flow was linearly related to Penman Evapotranspiration (PET), the ratio F /PET being close to 0.75 under dry canopy conditions, as previously reported by Shuttleworth et al. (1984) in Central Amazon. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Elsevier

Transpiration of natural rain forest and its dependence on climatic factors

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0168-1923
DOI
10.1016/0168-1923(95)02252-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sap flow was measured on several species from the tropical rain forest in French Guiana during two successive years over the dry season. On bright days, sap flow densities (i.e. sap flow per unit of sapwood area) exhibited high variations from one species to another. Higher rates (3 to 4 kg dim −2 h −1 ) were observed on late stage forest species like Dicorynia guianensis, Eperua falcata or E. grandifolia , and lower rates on Vouacapoua americana and Carapa procera (1.0 to 1.5 kg dm −2 h −1 ). Calculated stand sap flow ( F ) was closely dependant on air vapour pressure deficit and less correlated to global radiation. A simple model of canopy conductance variations and hence of stand transpiration was derived from these measurements. Sap flow was linearly related to Penman Evapotranspiration (PET), the ratio F /PET being close to 0.75 under dry canopy conditions, as previously reported by Shuttleworth et al. (1984) in Central Amazon.

Journal

Agricultural and Forest MeteorologyElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1996

References

  • Pioneer and late stage tropical rainforest tree species (French Guiana) growing under common conditions differ in leaf gas exchange regulation, carbon isotope discrimination and leaf water potential
    Huc, R.; Ferhi, A.; Guehl, J.-M.
  • Stomatal and environmental control of transpiration in a lowland tropical forest tree
    Meinzer, F.C.; Goldstein, G.; Holbrook, N.M.; Jackson, P.; Cavelier, J.

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