Translocation as a tool for conserving imperiled fishes: Experiences in western United States

Translocation as a tool for conserving imperiled fishes: Experiences in western United States Conservation efforts for imperiled fishes in western United States have included numerous translocations, either among natural localities or from nature to propagation facilities then back into nature. The goal has been to increase population size and dispersion while maintaining genetic diversity, thus increasing probability of survival. Environmental laws governing translocations of fishes for conservation purposes involve complexities often equally as difficult to cope with as the biological problems of species' endangerment. Translocations perceived not to impinge on resource use or proprietary rights may be readily approved, while those which interfere with actual or projected development may meet strong resistance. Major biological considerations include the suitability and security of transplant sites (assurances that each meets a taxon's life-history and other requirements) and appropriateness of transplanted individuals (genetic and population structure, sufficient numbers of individuals, freedom from disease, etc.) for establishing new populations. Success of translocation is difficult to define and major inadequacies exist in information exchange — the latter can be remedied by publication in the peer-reviewed literature. It is anticipated that fish translocations and the technology required to support them will expand along with future needs and desires to re-establish native biotic elements in depleted communities and ecosystems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Translocation as a tool for conserving imperiled fishes: Experiences in western United States

Biological Conservation, Volume 72 (2) – Jan 1, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/0006-3207(94)00091-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Conservation efforts for imperiled fishes in western United States have included numerous translocations, either among natural localities or from nature to propagation facilities then back into nature. The goal has been to increase population size and dispersion while maintaining genetic diversity, thus increasing probability of survival. Environmental laws governing translocations of fishes for conservation purposes involve complexities often equally as difficult to cope with as the biological problems of species' endangerment. Translocations perceived not to impinge on resource use or proprietary rights may be readily approved, while those which interfere with actual or projected development may meet strong resistance. Major biological considerations include the suitability and security of transplant sites (assurances that each meets a taxon's life-history and other requirements) and appropriateness of transplanted individuals (genetic and population structure, sufficient numbers of individuals, freedom from disease, etc.) for establishing new populations. Success of translocation is difficult to define and major inadequacies exist in information exchange — the latter can be remedied by publication in the peer-reviewed literature. It is anticipated that fish translocations and the technology required to support them will expand along with future needs and desires to re-establish native biotic elements in depleted communities and ecosystems.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • Conservation and distribution of genetic variation in a polytypic species, the cutthroat trout
    Allendorf, G.W.; Leary, R.F.
  • Desert fishes
    Deacon, J.E.; Minckley, W.L.
  • Use of genetic characters in conservation biology
    Dowling, T.E.; DeMarais, B.D.; Minckley, W.L.; Douglas, M.E.; Marsh, P.C.
  • Response to Wayne, Nowak, and Phillip and Henry: Use of molecular characters in conservation biology
    Dowling, T.E.; Minckley, W.L.; Douglas, M.E.; Marsh, P.C.; DeMarais, B.D.
  • Conservation genetics of a spring-dwelling desert fish, Gambusia nobilis (Poeciliidae)
    Echelle, A.F.; Echelle, A.A.; Edds, D.R.
  • The conservation of freshwater fish: past and present experience
    Maitland, P.S.
  • Conservation genetics and the management of desert fishes
    Meffe, G.K.; Vrijenhoek, R.C.
  • Methods for fish biology
  • Recovery of the Gila topminnow: a success story?
    Simons, L.H.; Hendrickson, D.H.; Papoulias, D.
  • The role of disturbance in natural communities
    Sousa, W.P.
  • Fish culture in fisheries management

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