Transcriptional Heterochrony of scute and Changes in Bristle Pattern between Two Closely Related Species of Blowfly

Transcriptional Heterochrony of scute and Changes in Bristle Pattern between Two Closely Related... Temporal shifts in the expression of regulatory genes, relative to other events taking place during development, can result in changes in morphology. Such transcriptional heterochrony can introduce dramatic morphological changes that involve rather few genetic events and so has the potential to cause rapid changes during evolution. We have shown previously that stereotyped species-specific bristle patterns on the notum of higher Diptera correlate with changes in the spatial regulation of scute expression. scute encodes a proneural gene required for the development of sensory bristle precursors and is expressed before pupation in discrete domains on the presumptive notum at sites where the macrochaete precursors arise. Thus, for Ceratitis capitata and Calliphora vicina , species separated from Drosophila melanogaster by about 80 and 100 million years respectively, the domains of sc expression differ. In all three species, a second phase of ubiquitous sc expression, after pupation, precedes formation of the microchaete precursors. Here, we describe sc expression in Phormia terranovae , a species belonging to the family Calliphoridae that is closely related to C. vicina . We find that spatial regulation is almost identical between P. terranovae and C. vicina , in spite of their different bristle patterns. The timing of sc expression differs, however, between the two. The first spatially restricted phase of expression is slightly delayed and the second ubiquitous phase remarkably accelerated, such that there is a period of overlap. As a result, the last precursors from the first phase of expression arise at the same time as the first precursors from the second phase of expression and are morphologically indistinguishable from the late-arising microchaetes. These observations illustrate the power of developmental heterochrony in bringing about rapid morphological change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Biology Elsevier

Transcriptional Heterochrony of scute and Changes in Bristle Pattern between Two Closely Related Species of Blowfly

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/transcriptional-heterochrony-of-scute-and-changes-in-bristle-pattern-E6jrWEn1RR
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)
ISSN
0012-1606
eISSN
1095-564X
D.O.I.
10.1006/dbio.2002.0841
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Temporal shifts in the expression of regulatory genes, relative to other events taking place during development, can result in changes in morphology. Such transcriptional heterochrony can introduce dramatic morphological changes that involve rather few genetic events and so has the potential to cause rapid changes during evolution. We have shown previously that stereotyped species-specific bristle patterns on the notum of higher Diptera correlate with changes in the spatial regulation of scute expression. scute encodes a proneural gene required for the development of sensory bristle precursors and is expressed before pupation in discrete domains on the presumptive notum at sites where the macrochaete precursors arise. Thus, for Ceratitis capitata and Calliphora vicina , species separated from Drosophila melanogaster by about 80 and 100 million years respectively, the domains of sc expression differ. In all three species, a second phase of ubiquitous sc expression, after pupation, precedes formation of the microchaete precursors. Here, we describe sc expression in Phormia terranovae , a species belonging to the family Calliphoridae that is closely related to C. vicina . We find that spatial regulation is almost identical between P. terranovae and C. vicina , in spite of their different bristle patterns. The timing of sc expression differs, however, between the two. The first spatially restricted phase of expression is slightly delayed and the second ubiquitous phase remarkably accelerated, such that there is a period of overlap. As a result, the last precursors from the first phase of expression arise at the same time as the first precursors from the second phase of expression and are morphologically indistinguishable from the late-arising microchaetes. These observations illustrate the power of developmental heterochrony in bringing about rapid morphological change.

Journal

Developmental BiologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2002

References

  • Phylogenetic relationships among muscoidea (Diptera: calyptratae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences
    Bernasconi, M.V.; Valsangiacomo, C.; Piffaretti, J.C.; Ward, P.I.
  • Expression pattern of a butterfly achaete-scute homolog reveals the homology of butterfly wing scales and insect sensory bristles
    Galant, R.; Skeath, J.B.; Paddock, S.; Lewis, D.L.; Carroll, S.B.
  • Ontogeny and phylogeny: Revisited and reunited
    Gould, S.J.
  • Structure of cuticular mechanoreceptors of arthropods
    McIver, S.B.
  • Heterochrony and the phylotypic period
    Richardson, M.K.
  • Genetic analysis of bristle loss in hybrids between D. melanogaster and D. simulans provides evidence for divergence of cis- regulatory sequences in the achaete-scute gene complex
    Skaer, N.; Simpson, P.
  • Color pattern formation on the wing of the butterfly Pieris rapae . 1. Cautery induced alteration of scale color and delay of arrangement formation
    Takayama, E.; Yoshida, A.
  • The genetic control of heterochrony: Evidence from developmental mutants of Pisum sativum L
    Wiltshire, R.J.E.; Murfet, I.C.; Reid, J.B.
  • Deletion of a HoxD enhancer induces transcriptional heterochrony leading to transposition of the sacrum
    Zakany, J.; Gerard, M.; Favier, B.; Duboule, D.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off