Tracking diet variety in childhood and its association with eating behaviours related to appetite: The generation XXI birth cohort

Tracking diet variety in childhood and its association with eating behaviours related to... Research on the influence of early eating habits on eating behaviours related to appetite using a prospective approach is scarce, especially in children. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between changes in diet variety from 4 to 7 years of age and appetitive traits measured at 7 years of age. Participants are from the population-based birth cohort Generation XXI (2005–2006). The present analysis included 4537 children with complete data on a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) at both ages, and on the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire at 7y. A healthy diet variety index (HDVI) was calculated at both ages using data from the FFQ. To assess tracking of diet variety, tertiles of HDVI scores were calculated and then re-categorized as ‘maintain: low’, ‘maintain: high’, ‘increase’ and ‘decrease’. Although the HDVI score decreased from 4 to 7y (p < .001), it showed a high stability, a positive predictive value, and a fair agreement. Increasing diet variety, compared to maintaining a low variety, was inversely associated with the ‘Desire to Drink’ (β = −0.090, 95%CI: 0.174; −0.006) and ‘Satiety Responsiveness’ (β = −0.119, 95%CI: 0.184; −0.054) subdimensions and positively with ‘Enjoyment of Food’ (β = 0.098, 95%CI: 0.023; 0.172) and ‘Emotional Overeating’ (β = 0.073, 95%CI: 0.006; 0.139). Those classified as either increase or maintain a high diet variety, in comparison with maintaining a low variety, had lower scores of ‘Food Fussiness’. In conclusion, diet variety decreased from 4 to 7y with a fair tracking. Children with a higher diet variety were less fussy, had a lower desire to drink and a higher general interest in food. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

Tracking diet variety in childhood and its association with eating behaviours related to appetite: The generation XXI birth cohort

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.appet.2017.12.030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research on the influence of early eating habits on eating behaviours related to appetite using a prospective approach is scarce, especially in children. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between changes in diet variety from 4 to 7 years of age and appetitive traits measured at 7 years of age. Participants are from the population-based birth cohort Generation XXI (2005–2006). The present analysis included 4537 children with complete data on a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) at both ages, and on the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire at 7y. A healthy diet variety index (HDVI) was calculated at both ages using data from the FFQ. To assess tracking of diet variety, tertiles of HDVI scores were calculated and then re-categorized as ‘maintain: low’, ‘maintain: high’, ‘increase’ and ‘decrease’. Although the HDVI score decreased from 4 to 7y (p < .001), it showed a high stability, a positive predictive value, and a fair agreement. Increasing diet variety, compared to maintaining a low variety, was inversely associated with the ‘Desire to Drink’ (β = −0.090, 95%CI: 0.174; −0.006) and ‘Satiety Responsiveness’ (β = −0.119, 95%CI: 0.184; −0.054) subdimensions and positively with ‘Enjoyment of Food’ (β = 0.098, 95%CI: 0.023; 0.172) and ‘Emotional Overeating’ (β = 0.073, 95%CI: 0.006; 0.139). Those classified as either increase or maintain a high diet variety, in comparison with maintaining a low variety, had lower scores of ‘Food Fussiness’. In conclusion, diet variety decreased from 4 to 7y with a fair tracking. Children with a higher diet variety were less fussy, had a lower desire to drink and a higher general interest in food.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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