Timely knowledge elicitation from geographically separate, mobile experts during emergency response

Timely knowledge elicitation from geographically separate, mobile experts during emergency response Two crucial factors for effective emergency response are the speed with which the response strategy is implemented and the quality of the expert knowledge on which the response is based. We propose a method for using communication and computing technologies for eliciting and aggregating the knowledge of multiple, geographically separate experts that improves our ability to address these two issues. In our methodology, we send a description of the problem to the experts who in turn submit graphical representations of the responses they propose for addressing it. The representations are then aggregated into a hypothesized central representation. A cycle of voting then begins from which emerges either a consensus problem representation or a diagnosis of impasse. The result is a clear definition of the response problem for resolution. Results from an implementation of the algorithm over the Internet are presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Safety Science Elsevier

Timely knowledge elicitation from geographically separate, mobile experts during emergency response

Safety Science, Volume 35 (1) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0925-7535
eISSN
1879-1042
DOI
10.1016/S0925-7535(00)00031-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two crucial factors for effective emergency response are the speed with which the response strategy is implemented and the quality of the expert knowledge on which the response is based. We propose a method for using communication and computing technologies for eliciting and aggregating the knowledge of multiple, geographically separate experts that improves our ability to address these two issues. In our methodology, we send a description of the problem to the experts who in turn submit graphical representations of the responses they propose for addressing it. The representations are then aggregated into a hypothesized central representation. A cycle of voting then begins from which emerges either a consensus problem representation or a diagnosis of impasse. The result is a clear definition of the response problem for resolution. Results from an implementation of the algorithm over the Internet are presented.

Journal

Safety ScienceElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2000

References

  • Understanding and facilitating group problem structuring and formulation: mental representations, interaction and representation aids
    Massey, A.P.; Wallace, W.A.

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