Three-dimensional ecological footprint assessment for ecologically sensitive areas: A case study of the Southern Qin Ling piedmont in Shaanxi, China

Three-dimensional ecological footprint assessment for ecologically sensitive areas: A case study... The ecological management of ecologically sensitive areas is highly sensitive and complex. The three-dimensional ecological footprint assessment for ecologically sensitive areas plays a decisive role in the overall development of a region's ecological environment and can be helpful for promoting the coordinated and sustainable development of economic and natural capital utilization. Taking a typical ecologically sensitive area in the southern Qin Ling piedmont of Shaanxi (southern Shaanxi) as an example, this paper describes the per capita ecological footprint (EF) and per capita biological capacity (BC) from 2005 to 2015. In addition, based on an analysis of the utilization of capital stocks and flows and the ecological footprint depth (EFdepth) and size (EFsize), the factors driving changes in the region's ecological footprint size are revealed by a partial least squares model (PLS model). The results indicate that the per capita biological capacity in the southern Qin Ling piedmont of Shaanxi remained stable at 2.100 ha/cap and that the per capita ecological footprint increased, with fluctuations between 1.359 ha/cap and 2.239 ha/cap. After the first appearance of a per capita ecological deficit in 2013, the ecological footprint depth peaked in 2014 at 1.049 ha/cap. The capital stocks consumption rate was well controlled, which meant that capital flows remained the main source of natural capital. The main factors driving the ecological footprint size are commonly used arable land, the per capita disposable income of urban residents and the primary industry output value. Therefore, some suggestions are offered as follows: control the land use for urbanization, accelerate industrial restructuring and upgrading, and establish a mechanism for environmental monitoring and warning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cleaner Production Elsevier

Three-dimensional ecological footprint assessment for ecologically sensitive areas: A case study of the Southern Qin Ling piedmont in Shaanxi, China

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/three-dimensional-ecological-footprint-assessment-for-ecologically-GJI6hBvBZc
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-6526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.05.132
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ecological management of ecologically sensitive areas is highly sensitive and complex. The three-dimensional ecological footprint assessment for ecologically sensitive areas plays a decisive role in the overall development of a region's ecological environment and can be helpful for promoting the coordinated and sustainable development of economic and natural capital utilization. Taking a typical ecologically sensitive area in the southern Qin Ling piedmont of Shaanxi (southern Shaanxi) as an example, this paper describes the per capita ecological footprint (EF) and per capita biological capacity (BC) from 2005 to 2015. In addition, based on an analysis of the utilization of capital stocks and flows and the ecological footprint depth (EFdepth) and size (EFsize), the factors driving changes in the region's ecological footprint size are revealed by a partial least squares model (PLS model). The results indicate that the per capita biological capacity in the southern Qin Ling piedmont of Shaanxi remained stable at 2.100 ha/cap and that the per capita ecological footprint increased, with fluctuations between 1.359 ha/cap and 2.239 ha/cap. After the first appearance of a per capita ecological deficit in 2013, the ecological footprint depth peaked in 2014 at 1.049 ha/cap. The capital stocks consumption rate was well controlled, which meant that capital flows remained the main source of natural capital. The main factors driving the ecological footprint size are commonly used arable land, the per capita disposable income of urban residents and the primary industry output value. Therefore, some suggestions are offered as follows: control the land use for urbanization, accelerate industrial restructuring and upgrading, and establish a mechanism for environmental monitoring and warning.

Journal

Journal of Cleaner ProductionElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off