The use of complementary and alternative medicine in an Irish cohort of people with an iatrogenic hepatitis C infection: Results from a health and lifestyle survey

The use of complementary and alternative medicine in an Irish cohort of people with an iatrogenic... Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver disease world-wide with more than 170 million people chronically infected. 1 In developed countries the main mode of transmission is through the use of needles and syringes contaminated with infected blood or blood products 2 although past incidents of iatrogenic HCV infection have been reported in many countries 3,4 including Ireland. 5,6 There is a general consensus within the literature that people with chronic HCV infection present with deficits in quality of life. 7–10 As a consequence, many people with HCV infection have sought support for maintaining their health and wellbeing through the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). 11 The National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) 12 has described CAM “a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine”. The reported prevalence of CAM use in the general population varies widely (10–67%) across different countries. 13–15 Irish studies have reported on CAM use ranging from 20% to 27% in the general population 16 and 55% (226/406) in those with a chronic health condition such as breast cancer. 17 Internationally, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Complementary Therapies in Medicine Elsevier

The use of complementary and alternative medicine in an Irish cohort of people with an iatrogenic hepatitis C infection: Results from a health and lifestyle survey

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-use-of-complementary-and-alternative-medicine-in-an-irish-cohort-A0H00mV00C
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0965-2299
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ctim.2014.06.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver disease world-wide with more than 170 million people chronically infected. 1 In developed countries the main mode of transmission is through the use of needles and syringes contaminated with infected blood or blood products 2 although past incidents of iatrogenic HCV infection have been reported in many countries 3,4 including Ireland. 5,6 There is a general consensus within the literature that people with chronic HCV infection present with deficits in quality of life. 7–10 As a consequence, many people with HCV infection have sought support for maintaining their health and wellbeing through the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). 11 The National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) 12 has described CAM “a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine”. The reported prevalence of CAM use in the general population varies widely (10–67%) across different countries. 13–15 Irish studies have reported on CAM use ranging from 20% to 27% in the general population 16 and 55% (226/406) in those with a chronic health condition such as breast cancer. 17 Internationally,

Journal

Complementary Therapies in MedicineElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off