The use of collaborative electronic media for information sharing: an exploratory study of determinants

The use of collaborative electronic media for information sharing: an exploratory study of... This article reports an exploratory investigation of individual perceptions of factors that underlie the use of collaborative electronic media (electronic mail, World Wide Web, list serves, and other collaborative systems) for sharing information in a large state university in Australia. The model builds on the Constant et al.'s theory of information sharing. We propose that perceptions of information culture, attitudes regarding information ownership and propensity to share, as well as task and personal factors influence people's use of collaborative media. We found that task characteristics (task interdependence), perceived information usefulness and the user's computer comfort were most strongly associated with the person's use of collaborative media. Consistent with Constant et al.'s earlier findings, views of information ownership and propensity to share were significantly related to use. Interestingly, use of electronic media for sharing information and contacting people was weakly associated with a more structured, closed information culture. This implies that heavy users and sharers want more structured information flow in place, possibly due to their need to have reliable access to other individual's knowledge and information. Contrary to suggestions in the literature, a fully open, organic information culture may not always be most desirable. Implications for knowledge managers, practitioners and researchers are suggested. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Strategic Information Systems Elsevier

The use of collaborative electronic media for information sharing: an exploratory study of determinants

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0963-8687
DOI
10.1016/S0963-8687(00)00042-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article reports an exploratory investigation of individual perceptions of factors that underlie the use of collaborative electronic media (electronic mail, World Wide Web, list serves, and other collaborative systems) for sharing information in a large state university in Australia. The model builds on the Constant et al.'s theory of information sharing. We propose that perceptions of information culture, attitudes regarding information ownership and propensity to share, as well as task and personal factors influence people's use of collaborative media. We found that task characteristics (task interdependence), perceived information usefulness and the user's computer comfort were most strongly associated with the person's use of collaborative media. Consistent with Constant et al.'s earlier findings, views of information ownership and propensity to share were significantly related to use. Interestingly, use of electronic media for sharing information and contacting people was weakly associated with a more structured, closed information culture. This implies that heavy users and sharers want more structured information flow in place, possibly due to their need to have reliable access to other individual's knowledge and information. Contrary to suggestions in the literature, a fully open, organic information culture may not always be most desirable. Implications for knowledge managers, practitioners and researchers are suggested.

Journal

The Journal of Strategic Information SystemsElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2000

References

  • Structural and competitive determinants of a global integration strategy
    Birkinshaw, J.; Morrison, A.; Hulland, J.
  • Understanding the process of knowledge transfer to achieve successful technological innovation
    Gilbert, M.; Cordey-Hayes, M.
  • Work-family conflict in the dual-career family
    Higgins, C.; Duxbury, L.; Irving, R.
  • Use of partial least squares (PLS) in strategic management research: a review of four recent studies
    Hulland, J.S.
  • An empirical study of organizational culture and network-based computer use
    Kanungo, S.
  • Procedural justice, strategic decision making, and the knowledge economy
    Kim, W.C.; Mauborgne, R.
  • Information sharing and firm performance in Japan
    Morishima, M.

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