The use of acid hydrolysis for extracting minerals from shellfish for thermoluminescence detection of irradiation

The use of acid hydrolysis for extracting minerals from shellfish for thermoluminescence... Inorganic grits contained in shellfish can be used for the thermoluminescence detection of irradiation treatment. Acid hydrolysis of the flesh of the shellfish to leave the minerals behind has been explored as an alternative to the physical dissection method previously employed. The hydrolysis technique was developed and assessed using six species of shellfish ( Nephrops norvegicus , brown shrimps, mediterranean crevettes, black tiger prawns, warm water shrimps and king scallops). It has also been evaluated under interlaboratory trial conditions. In all cases, excellent discrimination between irradiated and unirradiated products was obtained using hydrolysis extracts. The method produces results which are comparable or better than conventional physical extraction, and has some benefits in sample handling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Chemistry Elsevier

The use of acid hydrolysis for extracting minerals from shellfish for thermoluminescence detection of irradiation

Food Chemistry, Volume 68 (2) – Feb 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-use-of-acid-hydrolysis-for-extracting-minerals-from-shellfish-for-3VKW1npksI
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0308-8146
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0308-8146(99)00200-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inorganic grits contained in shellfish can be used for the thermoluminescence detection of irradiation treatment. Acid hydrolysis of the flesh of the shellfish to leave the minerals behind has been explored as an alternative to the physical dissection method previously employed. The hydrolysis technique was developed and assessed using six species of shellfish ( Nephrops norvegicus , brown shrimps, mediterranean crevettes, black tiger prawns, warm water shrimps and king scallops). It has also been evaluated under interlaboratory trial conditions. In all cases, excellent discrimination between irradiated and unirradiated products was obtained using hydrolysis extracts. The method produces results which are comparable or better than conventional physical extraction, and has some benefits in sample handling.

Journal

Food ChemistryElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2000

References

  • Radiophobia: will fear of irradiation impede its future in food processing
    Jack, F.R; Sanderson, D.C.W

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off