The transfusion-associated transmission of parvovirus B19

The transfusion-associated transmission of parvovirus B19 Alberta Azzi, Massirno Morfini and Pier Mannuccio Mannucci HE HUMAN PARVOVIRUS B19 is a member of the family Parvoviridae (subfamily: Parvovirinae) that recently, because of its tropism for red blood cell progenitors, has been placed in the genus Erythrovirus. 1 Most parr are common animal pathogens, such as feline panleukopenia parvovirus and canine parvovirus. However, animal parvoviruses are not transmissible to humans and parvovirus B19 is the only known human-pathogenic parvovirus. 2 B 19 virus was discovered by chance by Y.E. Cossart and her associates 3 in 1975, while screening plasma of blood donors for hepatitis B antigen. It was first named "serum parvovirus-like virus" and then human parvovirus B 19, from the number of plasma samples in which it was found for the first time) The virus was independently described also in France and Japan, where it was called Auriltac or Nakatani antigen, respectively. Thus, B 19 virus was initially detected in asymptomatic individuals, and asymptomatic B19 infections occurs in 20% to 30% of individuals: It took several years to prove the causative role of B 19 virus in human diseases. Now B19 virus is known to be responsible for a variety of clinical manifestations, which depend http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Medicine Reviews Elsevier

The transfusion-associated transmission of parvovirus B19

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 W.B. Saunders Company
ISSN
0887-7963
DOI
10.1016/S0887-7963(99)80033-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alberta Azzi, Massirno Morfini and Pier Mannuccio Mannucci HE HUMAN PARVOVIRUS B19 is a member of the family Parvoviridae (subfamily: Parvovirinae) that recently, because of its tropism for red blood cell progenitors, has been placed in the genus Erythrovirus. 1 Most parr are common animal pathogens, such as feline panleukopenia parvovirus and canine parvovirus. However, animal parvoviruses are not transmissible to humans and parvovirus B19 is the only known human-pathogenic parvovirus. 2 B 19 virus was discovered by chance by Y.E. Cossart and her associates 3 in 1975, while screening plasma of blood donors for hepatitis B antigen. It was first named "serum parvovirus-like virus" and then human parvovirus B 19, from the number of plasma samples in which it was found for the first time) The virus was independently described also in France and Japan, where it was called Auriltac or Nakatani antigen, respectively. Thus, B 19 virus was initially detected in asymptomatic individuals, and asymptomatic B19 infections occurs in 20% to 30% of individuals: It took several years to prove the causative role of B 19 virus in human diseases. Now B19 virus is known to be responsible for a variety of clinical manifestations, which depend

Journal

Transfusion Medicine ReviewsElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1999

References

  • Persistent parvovirus B19 infections with different clinical outcome in renal transplant recipients: diagnostic relevance of PCR and of quantification of B19 DNa in sera
    Azzi, A; Zakrzewska, K; Bertoni, E
  • Persistent B19 parvovirus infections in hemophilic HIV-1 infected patients
    Musiani, M; Zerbini, M; Gentilomi, G
  • Evidence of persistence of human parvovirus B19 DNA in bone marrow
    Cassinotti, P; Burtonoboy, G; Fopp, M
  • Human parvovirus B19 encephalopathy
    Watanabe, T; Satoh, M; Oda, Y
  • Parvovirus B19 as a possible causative agent of fulminant liver failure and associated aplastic anemia
    Langnas, AN; Markin, RS; Cattral, MS
  • Hypoplastic anemia in hemophiliac first infused with a solvent-detergent treated factor VIII concentrate
    Morfini, M; Azzi, A; Zakrzewska, K
  • Transfusion-transmitted human parvovirus, B19 infection in a thalassemic patients
    Zanella, A; Rossi, F; Cesana, C
  • Chronic anemia due to parvovirus infection in a bone marrow transplant patient after platelet transfusion
    Cohen, BJ; Beard, S; Knowles, WA
  • Human parvovirus infection in haemophiliacs first infused with treated clotting factor concentrates
    Bartolomei Corsi, O; Azzi, A; Morfini, M
  • Transmission of human parvovirus B19 by coagulation factor concentrates
    Williams, MD; Cohen, BJ; Beddall, AC
  • Efficacy of high temperature dry heat in inactivating parvovirus
    Flores, G; Juarez, JC; Montoro, JB
  • Parvovirus B19 infection in patients with hemophilia
    Ragni, MV; Koch, WC; Jordan, JA

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