The transformation of triclosan by laccase: Effect of humic acid on the reaction kinetics, products and pathway

The transformation of triclosan by laccase: Effect of humic acid on the reaction kinetics,... This study systematically explored the effect of humic acid (HA) (as model of natural organic matter) on the kinetics, products and transformation pathway of triclosan (TCS) by laccase-catalyzed oxidation. It was found that TCS could be effectively transformed by laccase-catalysis, with the apparent second-order rate constant being 0.056 U−1 mL min−1. HA inhibited the removal rate of TCS. HA-induced inhibition was negatively correlated with HA concentration in the range of 0–10 mg L−1 and pH-dependent from 3.5 to 9.5. FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra showed a decrease of aromatic hydroxyl (phenolic) groups and an increase of aromatic ether groups, indicating the cross-linking of HA via C-O-C and C-N-C bonds during enzyme-catalyzed oxidation. Ten principle oxidative products, including two quinone-like products (2-chlorohydroquinone, 2-chloro-5-(2,4-dichlodichlorophenoxy)-(1,4)benzoquinone), one chlorinated phenol (2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP)), three dimers, two trimmers and two tetramers, were detected by gas chromatograghy/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (HPLC/Q-TOF/MS). The presence of HA induced significantly lesser generation of self-polymers and enhanced cross-coupling between HA and self-polymers via C-O-C, C-N-C and C-C coupling pathways. A plausible transformation pathway was proposed as follows: TCS was initially oxidized to form reactive phenoxyl radicals, which self-coupled to each other subsequently by C-C and C-O pathway, yielding self-polymers. In addition, the scission of ether bond was also observed. The presence of HA can promote scission of ether bond and further oxidation of phenoxyl radicals, forming hydroxylated or quinone-like TCS. This study shed light on the behavior of TCS in natural environment and engineered processes, as well provided a perspective for the water/wastewater treatment using enzyme-catalyzed oxidation techniques. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

The transformation of triclosan by laccase: Effect of humic acid on the reaction kinetics, products and pathway

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.10.119
Publisher site
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Abstract

This study systematically explored the effect of humic acid (HA) (as model of natural organic matter) on the kinetics, products and transformation pathway of triclosan (TCS) by laccase-catalyzed oxidation. It was found that TCS could be effectively transformed by laccase-catalysis, with the apparent second-order rate constant being 0.056 U−1 mL min−1. HA inhibited the removal rate of TCS. HA-induced inhibition was negatively correlated with HA concentration in the range of 0–10 mg L−1 and pH-dependent from 3.5 to 9.5. FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra showed a decrease of aromatic hydroxyl (phenolic) groups and an increase of aromatic ether groups, indicating the cross-linking of HA via C-O-C and C-N-C bonds during enzyme-catalyzed oxidation. Ten principle oxidative products, including two quinone-like products (2-chlorohydroquinone, 2-chloro-5-(2,4-dichlodichlorophenoxy)-(1,4)benzoquinone), one chlorinated phenol (2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP)), three dimers, two trimmers and two tetramers, were detected by gas chromatograghy/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (HPLC/Q-TOF/MS). The presence of HA induced significantly lesser generation of self-polymers and enhanced cross-coupling between HA and self-polymers via C-O-C, C-N-C and C-C coupling pathways. A plausible transformation pathway was proposed as follows: TCS was initially oxidized to form reactive phenoxyl radicals, which self-coupled to each other subsequently by C-C and C-O pathway, yielding self-polymers. In addition, the scission of ether bond was also observed. The presence of HA can promote scission of ether bond and further oxidation of phenoxyl radicals, forming hydroxylated or quinone-like TCS. This study shed light on the behavior of TCS in natural environment and engineered processes, as well provided a perspective for the water/wastewater treatment using enzyme-catalyzed oxidation techniques.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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