The spontaneous reafforestation in abandoned agricultural lands: perception and aesthetic assessment by locals and tourists

The spontaneous reafforestation in abandoned agricultural lands: perception and aesthetic... The ongoing European integration forces Switzerland to reduce its agricultural protectionism in the long run. At least for mountainous regions it is very likely that without the introduction of EC-compatible state subsistances—such as direct payments — large parts of the cultivated land might be abandoned and subject to spontaneous reafforestation. These subsidies, however, can be justified only if society assesses the prevention of old-field succession positively. In this context, landscape preference is a decisive criterion. In the present study perception and visual assessment of old-field succession was investigated in the central Alpine part of Switzerland, a region with an increasing amount of abandoned land. Using the social-science-technique of qualitative interviews, tourists and locals were asked to report on their perceptions and feelings during a standardized round trip through old-fields representing different successional stages. Four dimensions of landscape experience were found: ‘tradition’, ‘nature conservation’, ‘profit’ and ‘emotion’. None of the interviewees could be assigned to one and only this dimension. Moreover, people's attitudes are usually composed of more than one dimension. Therefore, most people experience spontaneous reafforestation in an ambivalent way and prefer partially reafforested landscapes with a high diversity. Partial ingrowth of forest into an agricultural landscape is even assessed as an improvement of its visual quality. However, if the resulting forest patches become too big and homogeneous, a negative feedback can be expected. It can be concluded that — from the point of view of landscape aesthetics — agricultural policy should prevent old-field succession primarily in those cases where spontaneous reafforestation might result in vast homogeneous forest patches. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscape and Urban Planning Elsevier

The spontaneous reafforestation in abandoned agricultural lands: perception and aesthetic assessment by locals and tourists

Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 31 (1) – Feb 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-spontaneous-reafforestation-in-abandoned-agricultural-lands-OXo0oFMi0R
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0169-2046
eISSN
1872-6062
D.O.I.
10.1016/0169-2046(95)93251-J
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ongoing European integration forces Switzerland to reduce its agricultural protectionism in the long run. At least for mountainous regions it is very likely that without the introduction of EC-compatible state subsistances—such as direct payments — large parts of the cultivated land might be abandoned and subject to spontaneous reafforestation. These subsidies, however, can be justified only if society assesses the prevention of old-field succession positively. In this context, landscape preference is a decisive criterion. In the present study perception and visual assessment of old-field succession was investigated in the central Alpine part of Switzerland, a region with an increasing amount of abandoned land. Using the social-science-technique of qualitative interviews, tourists and locals were asked to report on their perceptions and feelings during a standardized round trip through old-fields representing different successional stages. Four dimensions of landscape experience were found: ‘tradition’, ‘nature conservation’, ‘profit’ and ‘emotion’. None of the interviewees could be assigned to one and only this dimension. Moreover, people's attitudes are usually composed of more than one dimension. Therefore, most people experience spontaneous reafforestation in an ambivalent way and prefer partially reafforested landscapes with a high diversity. Partial ingrowth of forest into an agricultural landscape is even assessed as an improvement of its visual quality. However, if the resulting forest patches become too big and homogeneous, a negative feedback can be expected. It can be concluded that — from the point of view of landscape aesthetics — agricultural policy should prevent old-field succession primarily in those cases where spontaneous reafforestation might result in vast homogeneous forest patches.

Journal

Landscape and Urban PlanningElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 1995

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off