The significance of soil piping processes: inventory and prospect

The significance of soil piping processes: inventory and prospect ELSEVIER Geomorphology20 (1997) 209-218 Editorial R.B. Bryan ~, J.A.A. Jones b,, a Soil Erosion Laboratory, University ofToromo, Scarborough, Ont. M1C IA4, Canada b University of Wales, Institute of Earth Studies, Aberystwyth S¥23 3DB, UK The transfer of sediment from hillslope to river channel has been a topic of central importance in geomorphology since the earliest origins of the discipline. For many years it appeared that this was overwhelmingly dormnated by mass wasting or by transport in overland :flow. This view was reinforced by many geomorphologists but was particularly enhanced by R.E. Horton's work, which culminated in his pivotal paper on the development of drainage basins (Horton, 1945). The importance of surface flow erosion processes was supported by numerous field and experimental studies, many on dryland hillslopes or disturbed agricultural soils, where Hortonian overland flow is comparatively frequent. There were early reports of significant erosion by subsurface flow in nonkarstic areas (e.g. Bryan, 1919; Bond, 1941; Gibbs, 1945; Cockfield and Buckham, 1946; Fletcher and Carroll, 1948; Buckham and Cockfield, 1950), bwL in general subsurface erosion was regarded as a process of limited importance confined to certain materials, particularly in dryland regions. During the 1960s and 1970s, increasing evidence of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geomorphology Elsevier

The significance of soil piping processes: inventory and prospect

Geomorphology, Volume 20 (3) – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0169-555X
eISSN
1872-695X
DOI
10.1016/S0169-555X(97)00024-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ELSEVIER Geomorphology20 (1997) 209-218 Editorial R.B. Bryan ~, J.A.A. Jones b,, a Soil Erosion Laboratory, University ofToromo, Scarborough, Ont. M1C IA4, Canada b University of Wales, Institute of Earth Studies, Aberystwyth S¥23 3DB, UK The transfer of sediment from hillslope to river channel has been a topic of central importance in geomorphology since the earliest origins of the discipline. For many years it appeared that this was overwhelmingly dormnated by mass wasting or by transport in overland :flow. This view was reinforced by many geomorphologists but was particularly enhanced by R.E. Horton's work, which culminated in his pivotal paper on the development of drainage basins (Horton, 1945). The importance of surface flow erosion processes was supported by numerous field and experimental studies, many on dryland hillslopes or disturbed agricultural soils, where Hortonian overland flow is comparatively frequent. There were early reports of significant erosion by subsurface flow in nonkarstic areas (e.g. Bryan, 1919; Bond, 1941; Gibbs, 1945; Cockfield and Buckham, 1946; Fletcher and Carroll, 1948; Buckham and Cockfield, 1950), bwL in general subsurface erosion was regarded as a process of limited importance confined to certain materials, particularly in dryland regions. During the 1960s and 1970s, increasing evidence of

Journal

GeomorphologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1997

References

  • Subsurface runoff
    Anderson, M.G.; Burt, T.P.
  • Source areas of storm runoff
    Betson, R.P.; Marius, J.B.
  • Runoff production in peat-covered catchments
    Burt, T.P.; Heathwaite, A.L.; Labadz, J.C.
  • Partial area contributions to storm runoff in a small New England watershed
    Dunne, T.; Black, R.D.
  • Slope failures in the Ochil Hills, Scotland, November, 1984
    Jenkins, A.; Ashworth, P.J.; Ferguson, R.I.; Grieve, I.C.; Rowling, P.; Stott, T.A.
  • Soil piping and stream channel initiation
    Jones, J.A.A.
  • The effects of soil piping on contributing areas and erosion patterns
    Jones, J.A.A.
  • Soil pipes and their role in runoff generation and chemical denudation in a humid tropical catchment in Dominica
    Walsh, R.P.D.; Howells, K.A.

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