The returns to education in the sub-baccalaureate labor market, 1984–1990

The returns to education in the sub-baccalaureate labor market, 1984–1990 While the sub-baccalaureate labor market is large and growing, there has been relatively little analysis of its effects on employment. This paper adds to our knowledge by analyzing the Survey of Income and Program Participation, for the years 1984, 1987, and 1990. The benefits of sub-baccalaureate credentials—associate degrees and certificates—are generally positive and statistically significant, contrary to the critics of two-year institutions. However, the benefits of completing some postsecondary education but failing to earn credentials are much lower, especially for women; there are substantial variations in returns among fields of study; and individuals who do not find employment related to their field of study also have lower returns. The implications are that better information should be provided to students so they can make rational choices, and state and federal policy should emphasize practices to improve completion rates and placement rates in both two- and four-year institutions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economics of Education Review Elsevier

The returns to education in the sub-baccalaureate labor market, 1984–1990

Economics of Education Review, Volume 16 (3) – Jun 1, 1997

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0272-7757
eISSN
1873-7382
DOI
10.1016/S0272-7757(97)00002-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While the sub-baccalaureate labor market is large and growing, there has been relatively little analysis of its effects on employment. This paper adds to our knowledge by analyzing the Survey of Income and Program Participation, for the years 1984, 1987, and 1990. The benefits of sub-baccalaureate credentials—associate degrees and certificates—are generally positive and statistically significant, contrary to the critics of two-year institutions. However, the benefits of completing some postsecondary education but failing to earn credentials are much lower, especially for women; there are substantial variations in returns among fields of study; and individuals who do not find employment related to their field of study also have lower returns. The implications are that better information should be provided to students so they can make rational choices, and state and federal policy should emphasize practices to improve completion rates and placement rates in both two- and four-year institutions.

Journal

Economics of Education ReviewElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 1997

References

  • Postsecondary education and the sub-baccalaureate labor market: Corrections and extensions
    Grubb, W.N.
  • The economic benefits of a community college education
    Heinemann, H.; Sussna, E.
  • Market Signaling
    Spence, M.

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