The relationship between bone turnover and insulin sensitivity and secretion: Cross-sectional and prospective data from the RISC cohort study

The relationship between bone turnover and insulin sensitivity and secretion: Cross-sectional and... Bone metabolism appears to influence insulin secretion and sensitivity, and insulin promotes bone formation in animals, but similar evidence in humans is limited. The objectives of this study are to explore if bone turnover markers were associated with insulin secretion and sensitivity and to determine if bone turnover markers predict changes in insulin secretion and sensitivity. The study population encompassed 576 non-diabetic adult men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n=503) or impaired glucose regulation (IGR; n=73). Baseline markers of bone resorption (CTX) and formation (P1NP) were determined in the fasting state and after a 2-h hyperinsulinaemic, euglycaemic clamp. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed at baseline, and the OGTT was repeated after 3years. There were no differences in bone turnover marker levels between NGT and IGR. CTX and P1NP levels decreased by 8.0% (p<0.001) and 1.9% (p<0.01) between baseline and steady-state during the clamp. Fasting plasma glucose was inversely associated with CTX and P1NP both before and after adjustment for recruitment centre, age, BMI, smoking and physical activity. However, baseline bone turnover markers were neither associated with insulin sensitivity (assessed using hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp and OGTT) nor with insulin secretion capacity (based on IVGTT and OGTT) at baseline or at follow-up. Although inverse associations between fasting glucose and markers of bone turnover were identified, this study cannot support an association between insulin secretion and sensitivity in healthy, non-diabetic men. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bone Elsevier

The relationship between bone turnover and insulin sensitivity and secretion: Cross-sectional and prospective data from the RISC cohort study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-relationship-between-bone-turnover-and-insulin-sensitivity-and-x7u0epqP97
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 The Authors
ISSN
8756-3282
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.bone.2017.12.029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bone metabolism appears to influence insulin secretion and sensitivity, and insulin promotes bone formation in animals, but similar evidence in humans is limited. The objectives of this study are to explore if bone turnover markers were associated with insulin secretion and sensitivity and to determine if bone turnover markers predict changes in insulin secretion and sensitivity. The study population encompassed 576 non-diabetic adult men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n=503) or impaired glucose regulation (IGR; n=73). Baseline markers of bone resorption (CTX) and formation (P1NP) were determined in the fasting state and after a 2-h hyperinsulinaemic, euglycaemic clamp. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed at baseline, and the OGTT was repeated after 3years. There were no differences in bone turnover marker levels between NGT and IGR. CTX and P1NP levels decreased by 8.0% (p<0.001) and 1.9% (p<0.01) between baseline and steady-state during the clamp. Fasting plasma glucose was inversely associated with CTX and P1NP both before and after adjustment for recruitment centre, age, BMI, smoking and physical activity. However, baseline bone turnover markers were neither associated with insulin sensitivity (assessed using hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp and OGTT) nor with insulin secretion capacity (based on IVGTT and OGTT) at baseline or at follow-up. Although inverse associations between fasting glucose and markers of bone turnover were identified, this study cannot support an association between insulin secretion and sensitivity in healthy, non-diabetic men.

Journal

BoneElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off