The relationship between airborne fine particle matter and emergency ambulance dispatches in a southwestern city in Chengdu, China

The relationship between airborne fine particle matter and emergency ambulance dispatches in a... High levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are known to cause adverse effects to human health. The goal of this study was to estimate the acute health effects of short-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 by analyzing cause-specific emergency ambulance dispatches as the endpoint in Chengdu, a city in Sichuan Province in southwest China. The ambient PM2.5 concentration of Chengdu reached 63 μg/m3 in 2015. Data related to the causes of specific emergency ambulance dispatches, air pollution, and meteorological conditions were collected from 2013 to 2015 (1095 days). A generalized additive model (GAM) was constructed to control the confounding conditions and to estimate the effects of PM2.5 on human health conditions. Emergency ambulance dispatches for all causes with (RR for lag0 = 1.0010, 95%CI: 1.0002, 1.0019) or without injuries (RR for lag0 = 1.0012, 95%CI: 1.0002, 1.0022), respiratory diseases (RR for lag0 = 1.0051, 95%CI: 1.0012, 1.0089), and cardiovascular diseases (RR for lag0 = 1.0041, 95%CI: 1.0009, 1.0074) were associated with ambient PM2.5 concentrations in Chengdu. In addition, the effects of PM2.5 were not confounded by ozone. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

The relationship between airborne fine particle matter and emergency ambulance dispatches in a southwestern city in Chengdu, China

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-relationship-between-airborne-fine-particle-matter-and-emergency-tb2ZVcwM26
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.06.098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are known to cause adverse effects to human health. The goal of this study was to estimate the acute health effects of short-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 by analyzing cause-specific emergency ambulance dispatches as the endpoint in Chengdu, a city in Sichuan Province in southwest China. The ambient PM2.5 concentration of Chengdu reached 63 μg/m3 in 2015. Data related to the causes of specific emergency ambulance dispatches, air pollution, and meteorological conditions were collected from 2013 to 2015 (1095 days). A generalized additive model (GAM) was constructed to control the confounding conditions and to estimate the effects of PM2.5 on human health conditions. Emergency ambulance dispatches for all causes with (RR for lag0 = 1.0010, 95%CI: 1.0002, 1.0019) or without injuries (RR for lag0 = 1.0012, 95%CI: 1.0002, 1.0022), respiratory diseases (RR for lag0 = 1.0051, 95%CI: 1.0012, 1.0089), and cardiovascular diseases (RR for lag0 = 1.0041, 95%CI: 1.0009, 1.0074) were associated with ambient PM2.5 concentrations in Chengdu. In addition, the effects of PM2.5 were not confounded by ozone.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off