The profile of volatile compounds in the outer and inner parts of broiled pork neck is strongly influenced by the acetic-acid marination conditions

The profile of volatile compounds in the outer and inner parts of broiled pork neck is strongly... Raw pork neck cutlets were marinated in an aqueous solution of acetic acid (pH4, 24h, 4°C) without (M) or with 1% (w/w) of glucose. The control (K) was formed by non-treated raw pork neck. The cutlets were then broiled (185°C, 30min). In all K cutlets, significant higher amounts of volatile compounds (VCs) were developed after broiling than the other samples. Significant more aldehydes and alcohols were present in the inner parts than in the surface. The correlation between surface and internal layers was high only for aldehydes. Marinating decreased the differences among VCs and led to the standardization of the processed meat. The addition of glucose to the marinade led to more volatile aldehydes, carboxylic acids, esters, furan, pyran, pyrazine, pyrrol and pyridine derivatives than in M samples. Several (53) specific VCs explained the differences among the surface samples related to the marinating process. However, only 16 VCs explained the variance among the inner parts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Meat Science Elsevier

The profile of volatile compounds in the outer and inner parts of broiled pork neck is strongly influenced by the acetic-acid marination conditions

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0309-1740
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.meatsci.2016.06.029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Raw pork neck cutlets were marinated in an aqueous solution of acetic acid (pH4, 24h, 4°C) without (M) or with 1% (w/w) of glucose. The control (K) was formed by non-treated raw pork neck. The cutlets were then broiled (185°C, 30min). In all K cutlets, significant higher amounts of volatile compounds (VCs) were developed after broiling than the other samples. Significant more aldehydes and alcohols were present in the inner parts than in the surface. The correlation between surface and internal layers was high only for aldehydes. Marinating decreased the differences among VCs and led to the standardization of the processed meat. The addition of glucose to the marinade led to more volatile aldehydes, carboxylic acids, esters, furan, pyran, pyrazine, pyrrol and pyridine derivatives than in M samples. Several (53) specific VCs explained the differences among the surface samples related to the marinating process. However, only 16 VCs explained the variance among the inner parts.

Journal

Meat ScienceElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2016

References

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