The power of size: A meta-analysis reveals consistency of allometric regressions

The power of size: A meta-analysis reveals consistency of allometric regressions The recent revival of body size relationships in ecology has boosted our understanding of ecosystems. Here, a simple model, based on energy equivalency, integrates rate, age, density and area parameters that are important in ecological modelling. Allometric relationships for quantities as diverse as ingestion, mortality, age at maturity, maximum density, territory size of different species groups and trophic levels are derived from production and some ecological transfer efficiencies. The theory is supported by a meta-analysis of 230 allometric regressions derived from over 100 publications. The relationships are shown to be mutually consistent and fit into the model. Rate constants generally decrease with organism mass at an exponent of −1/4. Age and density parameters increase in the same direction following a slope of 1/4. Differences between plants, invertebrates, cold-blooded vertebrates and warm-blooded vertebrates are reflected in the intercepts and can be anticipated from temperature, trophic position and evolutionary history. Cold-blooded species have lower rate constants but reach higher ages and densities than equally sized warm-blooded organisms. Intercepts of body size distributions tend to decrease with trophic position, at a level that is predicted by ecological efficiencies. Area parameters, such as the territory size and geographic range, tend to decrease with species size, but slopes and intercepts were often different from the expected value. Occasionally, outliers were also noted for rate, time or density parameters. With the model at hand, such deviations can be easily identified and subjected to more extensive empirical and theoretical research. With these restrictions, specific issues can now be addressed by a framework that complies with extensive information on related parameters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Modelling Elsevier

The power of size: A meta-analysis reveals consistency of allometric regressions

Ecological Modelling, Volume 205 (1) – Jul 10, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-power-of-size-a-meta-analysis-reveals-consistency-of-allometric-mtpxBdzylJ
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0304-3800
eISSN
1872-7026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2007.02.029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The recent revival of body size relationships in ecology has boosted our understanding of ecosystems. Here, a simple model, based on energy equivalency, integrates rate, age, density and area parameters that are important in ecological modelling. Allometric relationships for quantities as diverse as ingestion, mortality, age at maturity, maximum density, territory size of different species groups and trophic levels are derived from production and some ecological transfer efficiencies. The theory is supported by a meta-analysis of 230 allometric regressions derived from over 100 publications. The relationships are shown to be mutually consistent and fit into the model. Rate constants generally decrease with organism mass at an exponent of −1/4. Age and density parameters increase in the same direction following a slope of 1/4. Differences between plants, invertebrates, cold-blooded vertebrates and warm-blooded vertebrates are reflected in the intercepts and can be anticipated from temperature, trophic position and evolutionary history. Cold-blooded species have lower rate constants but reach higher ages and densities than equally sized warm-blooded organisms. Intercepts of body size distributions tend to decrease with trophic position, at a level that is predicted by ecological efficiencies. Area parameters, such as the territory size and geographic range, tend to decrease with species size, but slopes and intercepts were often different from the expected value. Occasionally, outliers were also noted for rate, time or density parameters. With the model at hand, such deviations can be easily identified and subjected to more extensive empirical and theoretical research. With these restrictions, specific issues can now be addressed by a framework that complies with extensive information on related parameters.

Journal

Ecological ModellingElsevier

Published: Jul 10, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off