The power of play: The effects of Portal 2 and Lumosity on cognitive and noncognitive skills

The power of play: The effects of Portal 2 and Lumosity on cognitive and noncognitive skills 1 Introduction</h5> Most children and young adults gravitate toward digital games. The Pew Internet and American Life Project surveyed 1102 youth between the ages of 12 and 17 and found that 97%—both males (99%) and females (94%)—play some type of digital game ( Lenhart et al., 2008 ). Escobar-Chaves and Anderson (2008) further note that the amount of time spent playing digital games continues to increase, and has since the introduction of home computers and gaming consoles in the mid-1980s. The increase in digital game play can be seen in a Kaiser Foundation study ( Rideout, Foerh, & Roberts, 2010 ) that found that 60% of individuals aged 8 to 18 played digital games on a typical day in 2009, compared to 52% in 2004 and 38% in 1999. These young people aren't playing in isolation, either; Ito et al. (2010) found that playing digital games with friends and family is a large and normal part of the daily lives of youth.</P>Besides being a popular activity across gender, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, playing digital games has been shown to be positively related to various competencies, attributes, and outcomes such as visual-spatial skills and attention (e.g., Green & Bavelier, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers & Education Elsevier

The power of play: The effects of Portal 2 and Lumosity on cognitive and noncognitive skills

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1315
eISSN
1873-782X
DOI
10.1016/j.compedu.2014.08.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Most children and young adults gravitate toward digital games. The Pew Internet and American Life Project surveyed 1102 youth between the ages of 12 and 17 and found that 97%—both males (99%) and females (94%)—play some type of digital game ( Lenhart et al., 2008 ). Escobar-Chaves and Anderson (2008) further note that the amount of time spent playing digital games continues to increase, and has since the introduction of home computers and gaming consoles in the mid-1980s. The increase in digital game play can be seen in a Kaiser Foundation study ( Rideout, Foerh, & Roberts, 2010 ) that found that 60% of individuals aged 8 to 18 played digital games on a typical day in 2009, compared to 52% in 2004 and 38% in 1999. These young people aren't playing in isolation, either; Ito et al. (2010) found that playing digital games with friends and family is a large and normal part of the daily lives of youth.</P>Besides being a popular activity across gender, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, playing digital games has been shown to be positively related to various competencies, attributes, and outcomes such as visual-spatial skills and attention (e.g., Green & Bavelier,

Journal

Computers & EducationElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2015

References

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