The plan of the day: Managing the dynamic transition from regional conservation designs to local conservation actions

The plan of the day: Managing the dynamic transition from regional conservation designs to local... 1 Introduction</h5> Systematic conservation planning involves sequential transitions between groups of decisions ( Pressey and Bottrill, 2009 ). Early in the process, stakeholders define goals, then goals determine what spatial data are needed. Later, spatial data inform decisions about quantitative objectives, and objectives guide the design of conservation areas. Then potential conservation areas on paper or computer screens must be turned into actions on the ground or in the water. This last transition, from regional designs to local actions, has been difficult for conservation planners because it requires reconciliation between two spheres of decision-making ( Agardy, 2005; Mills et al., 2010 ), and perhaps even two world views: one recognizing the primacy and legitimacy of local decision making and one concerned with the dangers of parochialism and the benefits of wide perspectives ( Knight et al., 2008; Noss, 2010; Pressey and Bottrill, 2009; Smith et al., 2009 ). Yet, both regional designs and local actions are crucial to achieving conservation goals, and both have complementary strengths and limitations.</P>We refer to “regional” as any spatial extent that provides broad perspective for decisions about individual conservation areas ( Table 1 ). We define regional designs as systems of notional conservation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

The plan of the day: Managing the dynamic transition from regional conservation designs to local conservation actions

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.biocon.2013.06.025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Systematic conservation planning involves sequential transitions between groups of decisions ( Pressey and Bottrill, 2009 ). Early in the process, stakeholders define goals, then goals determine what spatial data are needed. Later, spatial data inform decisions about quantitative objectives, and objectives guide the design of conservation areas. Then potential conservation areas on paper or computer screens must be turned into actions on the ground or in the water. This last transition, from regional designs to local actions, has been difficult for conservation planners because it requires reconciliation between two spheres of decision-making ( Agardy, 2005; Mills et al., 2010 ), and perhaps even two world views: one recognizing the primacy and legitimacy of local decision making and one concerned with the dangers of parochialism and the benefits of wide perspectives ( Knight et al., 2008; Noss, 2010; Pressey and Bottrill, 2009; Smith et al., 2009 ). Yet, both regional designs and local actions are crucial to achieving conservation goals, and both have complementary strengths and limitations.</P>We refer to “regional” as any spatial extent that provides broad perspective for decisions about individual conservation areas ( Table 1 ). We define regional designs as systems of notional conservation

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2013

References

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