The phytotoxicities of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) to different rice cultivars (Oryza sativa L.)

The phytotoxicities of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) to different rice cultivars (Oryza... Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), as a major component of brominated flame retardants, has been detected in the agricultural soil in considerable amount. Given that BDE-209 is toxic, ubiquitous and persistent, BDE-209 might induce toxic effects on rice cultivars planted in contaminated soil. A comparative study was conducted on phytotoxicities and GC-MS based antioxidant-related metabolite levels to investigate the differences of phytotoxicities of BDE-209 to rice cultivars in Yangtze River Delta of China. Rice seedlings were treated with BDE-209 at 0, 10, 50, 100 and 500 μg/L in a hydroponic setup. Results showed that BDE-209-induced phytotoxicites were cultivar-dependent and that the antioxidant defense systems in the cultivars were disturbed differently. Among the three selected cultivars (Jiayou 5, Lianjing 7 and Yongyou 9), Jiayou 5 and Lianjing 7 displayed lower toxic effects than Yongyou 9 in terms of the growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The increases of antioxidant enzymes were significantly higher in Jiayou 5 and Lianjing 7 than those in Yongyou 9. Multivariate analysis of antioxidant-related metabolites in the three cultivars indicated that l-tryptophan and l-valine were the most important ones among 10 metabolites responsible for the separation of cultivars. The up-regulation of l-tryptophan and l-valine were likely plant strategies to increase their tolerance. The current results provided an insight into the development of rice cultivars with higher BDE-209 tolerance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

The phytotoxicities of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) to different rice cultivars (Oryza sativa L.)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.079
Publisher site
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Abstract

Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), as a major component of brominated flame retardants, has been detected in the agricultural soil in considerable amount. Given that BDE-209 is toxic, ubiquitous and persistent, BDE-209 might induce toxic effects on rice cultivars planted in contaminated soil. A comparative study was conducted on phytotoxicities and GC-MS based antioxidant-related metabolite levels to investigate the differences of phytotoxicities of BDE-209 to rice cultivars in Yangtze River Delta of China. Rice seedlings were treated with BDE-209 at 0, 10, 50, 100 and 500 μg/L in a hydroponic setup. Results showed that BDE-209-induced phytotoxicites were cultivar-dependent and that the antioxidant defense systems in the cultivars were disturbed differently. Among the three selected cultivars (Jiayou 5, Lianjing 7 and Yongyou 9), Jiayou 5 and Lianjing 7 displayed lower toxic effects than Yongyou 9 in terms of the growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The increases of antioxidant enzymes were significantly higher in Jiayou 5 and Lianjing 7 than those in Yongyou 9. Multivariate analysis of antioxidant-related metabolites in the three cultivars indicated that l-tryptophan and l-valine were the most important ones among 10 metabolites responsible for the separation of cultivars. The up-regulation of l-tryptophan and l-valine were likely plant strategies to increase their tolerance. The current results provided an insight into the development of rice cultivars with higher BDE-209 tolerance.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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