The midbrain–hindbrain boundary organizer

The midbrain–hindbrain boundary organizer Cell fate in the cephalic neural primordium is controlled by an organizer located at the midbrain–hindbrain boundary. Studies in chick, mouse and zebrafish converge to show that mutually repressive interactions between homeodomain transcription factors of the Otx and Gbx class position this organizer in the neural primordium. Once positioned, independent signaling pathways converge in their activity to drive organizer function. Fibroblast growth factors secreted from the organizer are necessary for, and sufficient to mimic, organizer activity in patterning the midbrain and anterior hindbrain, and are tightly controlled by feedback inhibition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Neurobiology Elsevier

The midbrain–hindbrain boundary organizer

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0959-4388
DOI
10.1016/S0959-4388(00)00171-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cell fate in the cephalic neural primordium is controlled by an organizer located at the midbrain–hindbrain boundary. Studies in chick, mouse and zebrafish converge to show that mutually repressive interactions between homeodomain transcription factors of the Otx and Gbx class position this organizer in the neural primordium. Once positioned, independent signaling pathways converge in their activity to drive organizer function. Fibroblast growth factors secreted from the organizer are necessary for, and sufficient to mimic, organizer activity in patterning the midbrain and anterior hindbrain, and are tightly controlled by feedback inhibition.

Journal

Current Opinion in NeurobiologyElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2001

References

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