The Mid-Hungarian line: a zone of repeated tectonic inversions

The Mid-Hungarian line: a zone of repeated tectonic inversions The Mid-Hungarian line is a major tectonic feature of the Intra-Carpathian area separating two terranes of different origin and tectonic structure. Although this tectonic line was known from borehole records, it has not been described in seismic sections. The study presents interpreted seismic lines crossing the supposed trace of the Mid-Hungarian line. These seismic sections show north-dipping normal faults and thrust faults as well as cross-cutting young strike-slip faults. A complex tectonic history is deduced, including intra-Oligocene–Early Miocene thrusting, Middle Miocene extension, local Late Miocene inversion and Late Miocene–Pliocene normal faulting and left-lateral wrenching. In the light of our seismic study we think that the best candidate for the Mid-Hungarian line is a north-dipping detachment fault beneath large masses of Neogene volcanics. The auxiliary structures to the north seen on seismic sections suggest that it moved as a south-vergent thrust fault during the Palaeogene–Early Miocene which later was reactivated as a set of normal faults. The northern Alcapa unit overrode the southern Tisza–Dacia unit along this fault zone. The same relative positions are observed in the northern termination of the line. Other structures along the supposed trace of the line are north-dipping normal- or strike-slip faults which frequently were reactivated as smaller thrust faults during the late Neogene. Palaeogene–Early Miocene thrusting along the line might be the result of the opposite Tertiary rotations of the two major units, as suggested by palaeomagnetic measurements and earlier models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tectonophysics Elsevier

The Mid-Hungarian line: a zone of repeated tectonic inversions

Tectonophysics, Volume 297 (1) – Nov 20, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/the-mid-hungarian-line-a-zone-of-repeated-tectonic-inversions-6FrRBQ6eZ8
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0040-1951
eISSN
1879-3266
DOI
10.1016/S0040-1951(98)00163-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Mid-Hungarian line is a major tectonic feature of the Intra-Carpathian area separating two terranes of different origin and tectonic structure. Although this tectonic line was known from borehole records, it has not been described in seismic sections. The study presents interpreted seismic lines crossing the supposed trace of the Mid-Hungarian line. These seismic sections show north-dipping normal faults and thrust faults as well as cross-cutting young strike-slip faults. A complex tectonic history is deduced, including intra-Oligocene–Early Miocene thrusting, Middle Miocene extension, local Late Miocene inversion and Late Miocene–Pliocene normal faulting and left-lateral wrenching. In the light of our seismic study we think that the best candidate for the Mid-Hungarian line is a north-dipping detachment fault beneath large masses of Neogene volcanics. The auxiliary structures to the north seen on seismic sections suggest that it moved as a south-vergent thrust fault during the Palaeogene–Early Miocene which later was reactivated as a set of normal faults. The northern Alcapa unit overrode the southern Tisza–Dacia unit along this fault zone. The same relative positions are observed in the northern termination of the line. Other structures along the supposed trace of the line are north-dipping normal- or strike-slip faults which frequently were reactivated as smaller thrust faults during the late Neogene. Palaeogene–Early Miocene thrusting along the line might be the result of the opposite Tertiary rotations of the two major units, as suggested by palaeomagnetic measurements and earlier models.

Journal

TectonophysicsElsevier

Published: Nov 20, 1998

References

  • Exhumation of the Rechnitz Window at the border of the eastern Alps and the Pannonian Basin during Neogene extension
    Dunkl, I.; Demény, A.
  • From transpression to transtension: Oligocene–Miocene structural evolution of the Vienna basin and the East Alpine–Western Carpathian junction
    Fodor, L.
  • Significance of Late Permian–Triassic facies zones in terrane reconstructions in the Alpine–North Pannonian domain
    Haas, J.; Kovács, S.; Krystyn, L.; Lein, R.
  • Stress-induced late stage subsidence anomalies in the Pannonian Basin
    Horváth, F.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.
  • Structural evolution of the Transylvanian Basin (Romania): a sedimentary basin in the bend zone of the Carpathians
    Huismans, R.S.; Bertotti, G.; Ciulavu, D.; Sanders, C.A.E.; Cloetingh, S.; Dinu, C.
  • Far-field effects of Late Miocene subduction in the Eastern Carpathians: E–W compression and inversion of structures in the Alpine–Carpathian–Pannonian region
    Peresson, H.; Decker, K.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off