The influence of mechanical and chemical treatments on the environmental resistance of epoxy adhesive bonds to titanium

The influence of mechanical and chemical treatments on the environmental resistance of epoxy... 1 Introduction</h5> The surface treatment of aluminium aircraft structure prior to application of bonded repairs has successfully employed a process of grit-blasting and epoxy silane treatment for a number of years [1] . This treatment may also be employed to modify a range of metallic substrates such as titanium and steel. However, the environmental resistance of adhesive bonds prepared with the grit-blast and epoxy silane treated titanium have typically been poorer than for aluminium alloys. A number of intermediate steps are used in the grit-blast and epoxy silane process and an examination of some critical steps in the process have been undertaken in an attempt to determine how each step may affect the performance of the adhesive to titanium bonding.</P>Titanium represents a desirable material for the aerospace industry largely due to its high strength to weight ratio and high resistance to elevated temperatures and corrosion [2] . The preferred joining method for titanium structures is adhesive bonding, however, the key to its success relies on suitable surface treatments, which produce good bond strengths and durability. A variety of surface treatments for titanium have been described in the literature. Some initial work by Stone examined the performance grit-blasted titanium http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives Elsevier

The influence of mechanical and chemical treatments on the environmental resistance of epoxy adhesive bonds to titanium

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0143-7496
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ijadhadh.2013.09.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The surface treatment of aluminium aircraft structure prior to application of bonded repairs has successfully employed a process of grit-blasting and epoxy silane treatment for a number of years [1] . This treatment may also be employed to modify a range of metallic substrates such as titanium and steel. However, the environmental resistance of adhesive bonds prepared with the grit-blast and epoxy silane treated titanium have typically been poorer than for aluminium alloys. A number of intermediate steps are used in the grit-blast and epoxy silane process and an examination of some critical steps in the process have been undertaken in an attempt to determine how each step may affect the performance of the adhesive to titanium bonding.</P>Titanium represents a desirable material for the aerospace industry largely due to its high strength to weight ratio and high resistance to elevated temperatures and corrosion [2] . The preferred joining method for titanium structures is adhesive bonding, however, the key to its success relies on suitable surface treatments, which produce good bond strengths and durability. A variety of surface treatments for titanium have been described in the literature. Some initial work by Stone examined the performance grit-blasted titanium

Journal

International Journal of Adhesion and AdhesivesElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2014

References

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