The Influence of Anger and Compassion on Negotiation Performance

The Influence of Anger and Compassion on Negotiation Performance We examined whether the discrete, other-directed emotions of anger and compassion exert a greater influence on negotiations than mood. Drawing on cognitive appraisal theories of emotion, we specifically tested whether negotiators who felt high anger and low compassion for each other would (1) have less desire to work with each other in the future, (2) achieve fewer joint gains, and (3) successfully claim more value for themselves than negotiators who had more positive emotional regard for the other party. The results of a mixed-motive simulation experiment confirmed the first two predictions but not the last. The results confirmed that anger and compassion exerted a greater influence than mood. These findings indicate why prior advice stemming from the conflict and negotiation literature for managing anger has been counterproductive and suggest contrasting prescriptions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes Elsevier

The Influence of Anger and Compassion on Negotiation Performance

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Academic Press
ISSN
0749-5978
DOI
10.1006/obhd.1997.2705
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined whether the discrete, other-directed emotions of anger and compassion exert a greater influence on negotiations than mood. Drawing on cognitive appraisal theories of emotion, we specifically tested whether negotiators who felt high anger and low compassion for each other would (1) have less desire to work with each other in the future, (2) achieve fewer joint gains, and (3) successfully claim more value for themselves than negotiators who had more positive emotional regard for the other party. The results of a mixed-motive simulation experiment confirmed the first two predictions but not the last. The results confirmed that anger and compassion exerted a greater influence than mood. These findings indicate why prior advice stemming from the conflict and negotiation literature for managing anger has been counterproductive and suggest contrasting prescriptions.

Journal

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision ProcessesElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 1997

References

  • The evolution of cooperation
    Axelrod, R
  • Environmentally induced positive affect: Its impact on self-efficacy, task performance, negotiation, and conflict
    Baron, R.A
  • Affect in dyadic negotiation: A model and propositions
    Barry, B; Oliver, R.L
  • Negotiating rationally
    Bazerman, M.H; Neale, M.A

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